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AfriCat Staff

louis heyns

Louis Heyns -  Park & Research Manager: AfriCat & Okonjima. Louis grew up in the coastal town Swakopmund. After 15 years as a tour guide in Namibia and South Africa he came to Okonjima in August 2011 to run the volunteer program PAWS – People and Wildlife Solutions. Louis and his team received volunteers from all over the world, teaching them about conservation and the wildlife of Namibia while getting their hands dirty. In December 2012, when PAWS was put to rest to make way for our Enviromental Education Program, Louis was offered to join Team AfriCat as key supervisor of the rehabilitated carnivores in the 20 000ha Okonjima Nature Reserve.

From dusk till dawn, Louis carefully monitors all the carnivores in the reserve. This includes making sure the rehabilitated cheetahs are hunting on their own and if there is enough water in the area, following the pack of wild dogs and checking up on the spotted hyaenas. As a part of our ongoing prey and predator density study in Okonjima, Louis also monitors the leopards in the reserve, their movements, territories and setting up boxtraps with live camera feeds to catch and collar our leopards for research purposes.

As AfriCat's Park & Research Manager, Louis has made it his mission to make sure the rehabilitated and wild animals are looked after. He also takes care of VIP guests, donors and sponsors and updates them on the work of the AfriCat Foundation.

selma

Selma Amadhila - AfriCat Junior Manager. In January 2014, we welcomed Selma Amadhila to Team AfriCat. Selma is from Ondangwa, and she came straight out of University after 5 years of majoring in Tourism Management & Environmental studies at the University of Namibia, with an Honours Bachelor’s degree. She was handpicked among 53 other applicants because of her passion for wild life conservation, the human wildlife conflict but most of all because of her love for animals and living in the bush.
Selma is honoured to join the AfriCat Team and has vowed to carry on the mission – the long-term conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores.

jenny noack

M.Sc Jenny Noack - AfriCat Researcher and Biologist.
Jenny Noack joined Team AfriCat in September 2014. She studied biology in Germany and completed her Bachelor of Science at the Freie Universität zu Berlin in 2010 and specialized afterwards in Evolution and Organismic Biology with emphasis on Zoology and Conservation at the Humboldt Universität zu Berlin. Jenny finished her studies with a Master of Science degree after a 4-months field project at the AfriCat North headquarters that aimed to investigate the occurrence of large carnivores and their potential prey species via the application of camera traps.

Jenny’s love and passion for the African wildlife found its first practical experiences in South Africa and guided her back ever since. Besides coordinating and implementing the current Okonjima/ AfriCat leopard density study, Jenny is assisting with the monitoring of the rehabilitated cats in the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve and collects data of all the carnivores within the 200km² Nature Reserve. She assists with the AfriCat Environmental Education programme, the admin demands of the foundation, and takes care of our three orphaned wild dog pups Jogi, Messi and Robin.


Jenny Noack CV. (PDF)

sarah edwards

Sarah Edwards - AfriCat Researcher
Originally from Cheshire in the United Kingdom, Sarah first came to Namibia in 2007 and fell in love with the country, its people and wildlife. Having gained a BSc in Animal Behaviour and Welfare at University Sarah studied ground squirrels on the NamibRand Nature Reserve for a year before returning to the UK to complete her masters in Animal Behaviour at Manchester Metropolitan University.

She then returned to Namibia to work on an environmental impact assessment on the potential impacts of mining on brown hyenas within the Sperrgebiet National Park, with the Brown Hyena Research Project, Luderitz, southern Namibia. After spending a year researching forest ecology in Cambodia, and working on an environmental impact assessment within the Sperrgebiet National Park she returned to Namibia to complete her PhD in human-wildlife conflict on commercial farmlands bordering the Namib-Naukluft and Sperrgebiet National Parks in southern Namibia with the Brown Hyena Research Project.

After completion of her PhD, Sarah was awarded a post-doctoral fellowship with the Centre for Wildlife Management of University of Pretoria which she completed in collaboration with the Cheetah Research Project of the Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research in east-central Namibia. During the two year fellowship Sarah worked on advancing methods for modelling cheetah abundance, spatial density estimation of leopard and serval within Khaudum National Park and leopard occupancy analyse within the Gondwana Canyon Park.

Sarah will be running the AfriCat brown hyena research project which aims to gain a better understanding of the spatial and social ecology of this misunderstood species when living in a closed reserve.

   

justina kaghuvi

Justina Kaghuvi – AfriCat House-keeping and Office Assistant. I am from Rundu – in the Kavango region, North-eastern Namibia. I found this position during the time my ex-boyfriend worked for Okonjima. I started working at AfriCat in the beginning of 2001 and have never looked back. Everyone at AfriCat is very friendly and helpful and always treat me well. Working at AfriCat teaches me and my child, who attends the local Perivoli Okonjima Country School -  to love and care for animals.

africat staff andries garab

Andries Garab - AfriCat Carnivore Care Centre Assistant. Andries Garab is a 28 year old young man, who hails from the beautiful town of Otjiwarongo, in central Namibia. Although I was born and bred in a town, my heart was always after working and living in the bush and doing farm work and that is how I found Okonjima and AfriCat. I was thrilled to start working for AfriCat last year in October. I enjoy my duties of feeding the cats and making sure their health is excellent and their camps are clean and up to standard. I have grown to love the concept of conservation and I am very happy to say that I am lucky to be part of the team that is making a significant impact for these carnivores in the long-run.

africat staff michael kudumo

Michael Kudumo - AfriCat Assistant Carnivore Caretaker. Michael Kudumo, is young man from Northern Namibia in Rundu, who came to Okonjima/AfriCat as a contractor to help with de-bushing within our Carnivore Care Centre. Michael was fascinated to see the cheetahs for the first time and was very interested to get to learn more about them. In August of 2017, Michael was appointed as assistant carnivore caretaker and since then he has flourished and learned the in’s & outs of feeding, observing and making sure that all carnivores are in a good condition. Michael says working for AfriCat Foundation is the best thing that happened in his life in a very long time.

lion guardians jan 2014

Lion Guards – 'Keepers of the Wilderness' left to right: Lion Guards German, Titus, Jackson & Kandavii
Mr. German Muzuma & Mr. Titus Turitjo of the Ehirovipuka Conservancy were joined by two additional Lion Guards, Mr. Jackson Kavetu and Mr. Uezekandavii Nguezeeta (Kandavii) during October 2013 and continue to monitor & report on lion whereabouts, encourage and guide farmers to adopt the AfriCat Livestock Protection programme, report incidents, patrol fences with Ministry of Environment & Tourism (MET), monitor & report poaching and other illegal activities, identify priority villages for kraal-building and carry the message of Conservation from the highest authorities to the farmer;

Essentially, these four men are assigned to various areas, elected by their communities. German, a Chief-in-waiting, is based in Otjokovare, the 'captial' of the Ehirovipuka Conservancy and co-ordinates the Lion Guard activities. Titus, is based along Etosha’s western boundary, covering an area of approx. 60 km2 on horse-back; he received a new saddle and saddle-blankets in order to make his 'ride' easier and to protect his horse’s back. Jackson hails from the Arisona farming community along the south-western border of Hobatere and Kandavii from the Onguta area, along the western border.

These men play a vital role in protecting the Hobatere lions and mitigating lion-farmer conflict on communal farmland.

titus turitjo

TITUS TURITJO - AfriCat Lion Guard of the Ehirovipuka Conservancy, was also employed by CCCP (AfriCat's Communal Carnivore Conservation Programme) in March 2012, to monitor & report on lion whereabouts, encourage and guide farmers to adopt the AfriCat Livestock Protection programme, report incidents, patrol fences with Ministry of Environment & Tourism (MET), monitor & report poaching and other illegal activities, identify priority villages for kraal-building and carry the message of Conservation from the highest authorities to the farmer.
AfriCat’s initiatives will effectively educate communal farmers as to how best to improve their livestock protection methods, thereby minimising predation. With the conflict situations reduced, hopefully fewer farmers will insist on the lions being destroyed, thus the Namibian lion population will be better protected.

More 'Lion Management Unit(s)' will be well-positioned to provide regular and reliable feedback to the AfriCat North Research and Monitoring teams, as well as to the Ministry of Environment & Tourism. This data will not only support research and much-needed information on the lions of Namibia, but also support the development of the Lion Management Policy. This is where German and Titus’s efforts are essential – they are the AfriCat voice within the farmer community and across the conservancy.

 

Ben muzuma

GERMAN MUZUMA - AfriCat Lion Guard of the Ehirovipuka Conservancy was employed by CCCP (AfriCat's Communal Carnivore Conservation Programme) in March 2012, to monitor & report on lion whereabouts, encourage and guide farmers to adopt the AfriCat Livestock Protection programme, report incidents, patrol fences with Ministry of Environment & Tourism (MET), monitor & report poaching and other illegal activities, identify priority villages for kraal-building and carry the message of Conservation from the highest authorities to the farmer.
The long term survival of the Namibian lion depends on sound management of our valuable lion population, but workable solutions to the Human-Wildlife Conflict, specifically the farmer-lion conflict, should first be in place.

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