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Day Centre

WELCOME TO THE AFRICAT DAY, CARNIVORE CARE & INFORMATION CENTRE!

TOURISM FUNDS & SUPPORTS THE MAJORITY OF AFRICAT'S EDUCATION & CONSERVATION WORK! 

Day-Visitors will now be able to observe some of this programme's work and learn more about these endangered, amazing & beautiful animals!

day centre dining

JOIN ALL THE SPOTS AND DOTS ON ROUTE BETWEEN WINDHOEK AND THE ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK . . .  WITH A QUICK STOP @ AFRICAT!!!

18km off the main rd (B1)
A 2 hour drive north from Windhoek and 20 minutes on gravel through the private reserve – is part of the experience when you visit us for the day.

It will be fun, informative and a refreshing drink or snack awaits you! There's a mountain hike up the hill on offer that will give you a bird's eye view of the OKONJIMA RESERVE . . . or a mountain hike down the hill for a swim in the camp-site pool!
Children are welcome!

Share in a small part of our BIG-CAT passion. The carnivores you will see, cannot be released back into the wild, because they are either: 
too tame;  were somebody’s pet and were hand-raised, which means they no longer fear/respect man;  have injuries that will disadvantage them when released and then have to hunt for themselves or have not been successful in the wild as part of AfriCat’s rehabilitation programme and were then  returned to our Care Centre.

day centre as the sun goes downday centre counter

Welfare is not conservation! However, if 'Welfare' is used to 'Educate' our guests, volunteers, young farmers and children about the plight of the predator and can help explain the human-wildlife conflict issue, in a relaxed and natural environment - surrounded by carnivores that CANNOT be released back into the wild – these animals then become ‘ambassadors’ for their wild species. It is, however, our responsibility to ensure that all captive animals are taken care of in every way. Their dietary and health requirements need to be maintained at all times and all captive animals need enough space to be able to get away from man.  Their enclosures need to be spacious and as true to their natural habitat as possible.

OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVE – home of The AfriCat Foundation, a non-profit organisation committed to long-term conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores. Okonjima’s 200km² private, nature reserve hosts four lodges, from rustic to exclusive, a camp-site and a Volunteer project.

day centre dining day centre lounge

YOUR VISIT TO AFRICAT’S DAY CENTRE WILL INCLUDE:

  • A visit to the AfriCat Carnivore Care Centre.
  • Duration approx. 1½ hours

Activity Departure TIMES:

  • Summer  @ 11:00 & @ 13:00
  • Winter @ 10:30 & @ 12:30 

Lunch:

A light lunch.
Lunch packs - prior arrangement necessary
Time: 12.30 - 14h30 (summer time)
Time: 12.00 - 14h00 (winter time)

 

Activity (compulsory) - N$400 per person

Children (age 4 to 12yrs) - N$350 per child

Lunch - N$ from 165

Lunch packs - from N$120

day centre view

PLEASE NOTE:

Children are welcome.

  • Due to the nature of our activities, child participation is restricted, depending on age and activity. 
  • A special indemnity will be signed by parents, taking full responsibility for any children under the age of 16 years.
  • Due to dangerous animals, we cannot guarantee their safety.
  • Okonjima reserves the right to amend these rates as and when necessary!

For more information see: http://okonjima.com/activities/day-visits-with-us/

Download our Day Centre poster

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 10 April 2017 12:54

Hits: 18011

Travel through Namibia

Why you should spend your next holiday in Namibia!
Okonjima as part of the Namibian Kaleidoscope
by Dr. Hu Berry  (formerly Chief Biologist of Etosha & Namib-Naukluft Parks)
 
Namibia is rated as one of Africa’s top travel destinations. That’s a claim requiring supportive evidence. Fortunately, there exists an abundance of examples to substantiate this assertion. Where else can the traveller stand atop a dune that towers well over 300 metres above the surrounding desert floor, and glimpse a fraction of 34 000 km2 of the dune "sea" that stretches westward to the fogbound emptiness of the Atlantic shoreline? To the south the so-called "Forbidden Area" (Sperrgebiet in German) invites exploration, invoking memories of times when diamonds lay in such profusion on the Namib floor that their collection was facilitated by searching for their brilliance under moonlight. The remnants of man’s habitation in this foreboding wilderness lie decaying under the relentless onslaught of wind and sand, their crumbling walls being stark reminders of the merciless forces of abrasive weather. Ghost towns of yesteryear crumble and dissolve into the desert sands.
 
 
 
East of this hauntingly beautiful area the Fish River Canyon beckons. Africa’s most amazing geological formation exposes 550 metres of water-eroded depth along a meandering 56 kilometres. The stratified layers tell a tale beginning 350 million years ago. Where ice glaciers once formed and later melted, the scene is now one of awesome desiccation, the eerie stillness relieved occasionally by the muffled rumble of the ephemeral Fish River in full flood. When this happens, eroded sediments are carried from as far away as its headwaters 650 kilometres to the north and discharged into the mighty Orange River, which in turn empties into the waiting Atlantic Ocean.
 
 
 
Finding a certain measure of relief from this harshness, travellers can wend their way northwards to relax in the bustling, cosmopolitan atmosphere of coastal Swakopmund, where the dour determination of early German settlers and modern innovative development has resulted in a unique combination of Euro-African flavour. First World comforts, in the form of excellent accommodation, restaurants, arts-and-crafts are to be found in the heart of the Namib Desert. Further north lies the Skeleton Coast, a place of desolation. A sense of loneliness accompanies all who venture in this domain of jackals and hyaenas as they ceaselessly scavenge the shoreline for offerings that the sea throws out.
 
Satiated with vistas of seemingly endless sand, sea and sky, turn eastward and inland. The emptiness gives way imperceptibly to sparse vegetation. Low bushes dot the landscape, becoming denser, and isolated mountain ranges jut their turrets into an azure, mostly cloudless sky. Enter the world of thorn savanna, an undulating land of seemingly endless bush, incised by dry riverbeds whose sandy beds hide the underground aquifers of life-giving water. These waterless washes may spring to life for only a few hours or days a year when flash floods transform them into brief torrents of swirling, sediment-rich watercourses. They are the life-giving arteries of moisture to many plants and animals, which could not survive this arid environment without these infrequent pulses of moisture.
 
 
The mountains were born out of a much younger world when infant Africa separated itself from the parent landmass of prehistoric Gondwana. Millions of years passed, witnessing the effects of weathering and erosion by the natural elements of wind, water, heat and cold. Rock-cracking temperatures formed sheer cliffs where vultures now roost and launch themselves to glide on air thermals for hundreds of kilometres. Contrasting in their smoothness, huge granite outcrops provide a multitude of habitats for a rich diversity of wildlife. So specialized are the plants, insects, reptiles, birds and mammals found in the mountain chain that fringes the desert, forming the western Great Escarpment, that they occur here and nowhere else on Earth. These endemics invite many hours of observation for the ardent nature lover.
 
Continuing inland, we enter the giant Kalahari Basin, a scoured, natural depression that stretches across several southern African countries. Nestling in its northern extremity, is the Etosha Pan, a saline desert surrounded by a National Park of world repute. Few other African countries can equal its ability to provide the visitor with the visibility and viewability of wildlife at close quarters. Unforgettable scenes of animal concentrations jostling for water at the natural fountains and boreholes that dot the Park, provide unequalled opportunities for observation and photography. At night, patience is rewarded at floodlit waterholes next to each of three resorts, when the dry season entices the big and strong to drink and bathe. Hook-lipped rhinos join elephants, lions and hyaenas under powerful spotlights, to fascinate onlookers for hours well into the night. It is a celebration of African wildlife, which confirms that Namibia is a paradise for those who want to experience and enjoy Nature.
 
To those journeying southwards to end their visit in Windhoek, another surprise awaits. About 50 kilometres south of Otjiwarongo lies Okonjima, home of the Africat Foundation. A gravel road takes you 24 kilometres further west, past some unique road signs – a stout warthog reminds you to drive with care; a diminutive dik-dik prompts you to remember that animals have the right of way; a leopard tells you that Okonjima is its domain. Entering a valley that lies within the Omboroko Mountains, you feel removed from the frenetic world outside. A 25 000-hectare sanctuary for wildlife surrounds you.
 
 
 
 

Last Updated on Friday, 07 September 2012 11:19

Hits: 4073

Visit Namibia

Why you should spend your next holiday in Namibia!
Okonjima as part of the Namibian Kaleidoscope
by Dr. Hu Berry  (formerly Chief Biologist of Etosha & Namib-Naukluft Parks) 
 
Namibia is rated as one of Africa’s top travel destinations. That’s a claim requiring supportive evidence. Fortunately, there exists an abundance of examples to substantiate this assertion. Where else can the traveller stand atop a dune that towers well over 300 metres above the surrounding desert floor, and glimpse a fraction of 34 000 km2 of the dune "sea" that stretches westward to the fogbound emptiness of the Atlantic shoreline? To the south the so-called "Forbidden Area" (Sperrgebiet in German) invites exploration, invoking memories of times when diamonds lay in such profusion on the Namib floor that their collection was facilitated by searching for their brilliance under moonlight. The remnants of man’s habitation in this foreboding wilderness lie decaying under the relentless onslaught of wind and sand, their crumbling walls being stark reminders of the merciless forces of abrasive weather. Ghost towns of yesteryear crumble and dissolve into the desert sands.
 
 
 
East of this hauntingly beautiful area the Fish River Canyon beckons. Africa’s most amazing geological formation exposes 550 metres of water-eroded depth along a meandering 56 kilometres. The stratified layers tell a tale beginning 350 million years ago. Where ice glaciers once formed and later melted, the scene is now one of awesome desiccation, the eerie stillness relieved occasionally by the muffled rumble of the ephemeral Fish River in full flood. When this happens, eroded sediments are carried from as far away as its headwaters 650 kilometres to the north and discharged into the mighty Orange River, which in turn empties into the waiting Atlantic Ocean.
 
Finding a certain measure of relief from this harshness, travellers can wend their way northwards to relax in the bustling, cosmopolitan atmosphere of coastal Swakopmund, where the dour determination of early German settlers and modern innovative development has resulted in a unique combination of Euro-African flavour. First World comforts, in the form of excellent accommodation, restaurants, arts-and-crafts are to be found in the heart of the Namib Desert. Further north lies the Skeleton Coast, a place of desolation. A sense of loneliness accompanies all who venture in this domain of jackals and hyaenas as they ceaselessly scavenge the shoreline for offerings that the sea throws out.
 
Satiated with vistas of seemingly endless sand, sea and sky, turn eastward and inland. The emptiness gives way imperceptibly to sparse vegetation. Low bushes dot the landscape, becoming denser, and isolated mountain ranges jut their turrets into an azure, mostly cloudless sky. Enter the world of thorn savanna, an undulating land of seemingly endless bush, incised by dry riverbeds whose sandy beds hide the underground aquifers of life-giving water. These waterless washes may spring to life for only a few hours or days a year when flash floods transform them into brief torrents of swirling, sediment-rich watercourses. They are the life-giving arteries of moisture to many plants and animals, which could not survive this arid environment without these infrequent pulses of moisture.
 
 The mountains were born out of a much younger world when infant Africa separated itself from the parent landmass of prehistoric Gondwana. Millions of years passed, witnessing the effects of weathering and erosion by the natural elements of wind, water, heat and cold. Rock-cracking temperatures formed sheer cliffs where vultures now roost and launch themselves to glide on air thermals for hundreds of kilometres. Contrasting in their smoothness, huge granite outcrops provide a multitude of habitats for a rich diversity of wildlife. So specialized are the plants, insects, reptiles, birds and mammals found in the mountain chain that fringes the desert, forming the western Great Escarpment, that they occur here and nowhere else on Earth. These endemics invite many hours of observation for the ardent nature lover.
 
Continuing inland, we enter the giant Kalahari Basin, a scoured, natural depression that stretches across several southern African countries. Nestling in its northern extremity, is the Etosha Pan, a saline desert surrounded by a National Park of world repute. Few other African countries can equal its ability to provide the visitor with the visibility and viewability of wildlife at close quarters. Unforgettable scenes of animal concentrations jostling for water at the natural fountains and boreholes that dot the Park, provide unequalled opportunities for observation and photography. At night, patience is rewarded at floodlit waterholes next to each of three resorts, when the dry season entices the big and strong to drink and bathe. Hook-lipped rhinos join elephants, lions and hyaenas under powerful spotlights, to fascinate onlookers for hours well into the night. It is a celebration of African wildlife, which confirms that Namibia is a paradise for those who want to experience and enjoy Nature.
cheetah-africat-sunset 
 
To those journeying southwards to end their visit in Windhoek, another surprise awaits. About 50 kilometres south of Otjiwarongo lies Okonjima, home of the Africat Foundation. A gravel road takes you 24 kilometres further west, past some unique road signs – a stout warthog reminds you to drive with care; a diminutive dik-dik prompts you to remember that animals have the right of way; a leopard tells you that Okonjima is its domain. Entering a valley that lies within the Omboroko Mountains, you feel removed from the frenetic world outside. A 25 000-hectare sanctuary for wildlife surrounds you.
 


Okonjima Lodge 2016
Situated halfway between the capital Windhoek and the Etosha National Park, the 55,000 acre Okonjima Game Reserve has some of the best accommodation in Namibia, but the highlight has to be the cheetah and leopard safaris, as Okonjima is home to The AfriCat Foundation. A non-for-profit Organisation that rehabilitates cheetahs, wild dogs and hyaenas giving you the opportunity to see these beautiful carnivores in their natural environment. If it’s a luxury safari you are looking for, then Okonjima has a Villa and Bush Suite where you will be truly spoiled, with your own chef and safari vehicle. There is accommodation to suit all budgets, from a private camp site to real safari lodges, but wherever you stay on Okonjima, you will be guaranteed an African safari to remember.

 


The Okonjima Nature Reserve 2016
WHY YOUR VISIT IS IMPORTANT?!
Wildlife conservation and tourism naturally go hand in hand, and tourism remains the cornerstone of success and funding at Okonjima. All visitors to Okonjima contribute indirectly to the AfriCat Foundation by staying in the lodges and partaking in activities.

 

okonjima home africat 400pxbaturally namibia 400px

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 29 May 2017 09:29

Hits: 24666

What Agents need to know

OKONJIMA LODGE & THE AFRICAT FOUNDATION
PO Box 793 Ojiwarongo NAMIBIA tel + 264 67 687032 / 33 fax + 264 67 687051 info@okonjimalodge.com www.okonjima.com
 
 
okonjima-daycenter-outer-view


Other email addresses: okonjima@okonjimalodge.com
A 'quickie' for ALL AGENTS.
TITLE

OKONJIMA - home of the africat foundation
SPELLING:

    OKONJIMA
    The AfriCat Foundation OR AfriCAT Foundation.
    OKONJIMA is a 'LODGE' and NOT a 'GUEST FARM'.
    Owned by WAYNE, DONNA & ROSALEA HANSSEN.
    TRISTAN BOEHME is a shareholder in the Lodge.
    TAMMY HOTH–HANSSEN is Director of AfriCat NORTH
    WAYNE HANSSEN is Founder of AFRICAT

70 WORD DESCRIPTION:

OKONJIMA - home of AfriCat, a non–profit organisation, committed to long–term conservation of Namibia's large carnivores.

Both Okonjima & AfriCat are dedicated to creating conservation awareness through education; preserving habitat; promoting environmental education, research and the rehabilitation of captive carnivores.

OKONJIMA hosts the exclusive Villa & Bush Suite, Bush Camp, Main Camp, the private Omboroko Campsite & the Volunteer Programme – PAWS.

Halfway between Windhoek and Etosha. (10kms off the B1) TOTAL: 70 words


150 WORD DESCRIPTION

OKONJIMA is the home of The AfriCat foundation, a non–profit organisation, committed to long–term conservation of Namibia's large carnivores.

OKONJIMA hosts the grand, African VILLA, the select, private BUSH SUITE, the luxury BUSH CAMP, MAIN CAMP, the exclusive OMBOROKO CAMPSITE and the Volunteer Prgm PAWS.
 
 
okonjima photo_1OKONJIMA Lodge is situated halfway between Windhoek and Etosha National Park. (10 kms off the B1)

Over a 1000 predators have been saved since 1993! 86% have been released back into the wild.

Both Okonjima & AfriCat are dedicated to creating conservation awareness through education; preserving habitat; promoting environmental education, research and the rehabilitation of captive carnivores.

The OKONJIMA activities
include tracking rehabilitated carnivores on foot; visiting the AfriCat Carnivore Care & Information Centre; tracking leopards from a game–viewing vehicle. OKONJIMA also offers a guided Bushman Trail. Birding and Game drives are offered on request and if guests stay longer than 2 days. TOTAL: 150 words


OKONJIMA OFFERS:

A budget, a luxury, and an exclusive product, HEREBY WELCOMING GUESTS FROM ALL WALKS OF LIFE! Guests visit OKONJIMA to experience The AfriCat Foundation.

    P.A.W.S - People And Wildlife Solutions: The Okonjima/AfriCat Volunteer Programme.
    A choice of 5 different activities during a 2 day programme (only 4 activities are incl in a FB rate).
    6 different CAMPS / ACCOMMODATION FACILITIES:
        The Grand African House – The Villa
        The Exclusive Bush Suite
        The Luxury Bush Camp
        The Homestead - Main Camp
        The Private Campsite - The Omboroko
        The PAWS Volunteer, Self–catering, Tented–site


 

Accommodation

Okonjima Nature Reserve - Home of AfriCat
Conservation through Education.
Researching Carnivores & Rehabilitating Captive Cheetah






cheetah-cubs-sugar-spice africat












The AfriCat Foundation, which was started in 1993, has become world RENOWNED for the work we do with Cheetahs and Leopards.

Over 1000 big cats have been saved since 1993 - 86% have been released back into the wild!
www.africat.org

Okonjima - from the Herero word meaning place of the baboons - lies nestled in the unspoilt beauty of the Omboroko Mountains, part of the well-known Waterberg Plateau - halfway between Windhoek and Etosha. (Okonjima Nature Reserve: 10km off the B1)

Not only is Okonjima a luxury lodge, but it is also home to The AfriCat Foundation, a non-profit organisation, committed to long-term conservation of Namibia's large carnivores, especially cheetahs and leopards.

A visit to Okonjima will give you an opportunity to witness some of AfriCat’s work.

Both Okonjima & AfriCat are dedicated to creating conservation awareness through education; preserving habitat; promoting environmental education, research and the rehabilitation of captive carnivores.
LOCATION BY ROAD OR AIR / PROPERTY SIZE:

OKONJIMA is half–way between Windhoek and Etosha National Park (2 1/2 hours drive - 10km off the  B1).
 
To those coming from the south (B1): Take the gravel turn–off to the left, just after the sign "Otjiwarongo 50km''.
To those coming from the north (B1): Take the gravel turn–off to the right, just after the sign "Okahandja 130km''. This turn–off is approximately 48km south of Otjiwarongo, and is marked "Okonjima 24km''.
 
Excellent tar road from Windhoek (B1) -  2 1/2 hours drive from Windhoek, 3 hours drive from the International Airport - Hosea Kutako. 3 - 4 hours drive to Etosha. To Main Camp: 24km of gravel road once you turn off the B1. Okonjima Nature Reserve is 10kms off the B1.

Guests should call ahead to confirm road conditions during the summer months!

OKONJIMA is centrally located thereby being ideally suited as a base from which to organise various excursions to other locations.

Air Access: Private airstrip - 1,3km, 5min drive from Main Camp, 15min from Bush Camp, 20 min from Bush Suite, 25 – 30min from The Villa.

Co–ordinates: S 20° 51' 59'' E 16° 38' 22''

Property Size: 22 000ha / 55 000 acres / 220 km2 - OKONJIMA Lodge encompasses 4 different farms - Okonjima 6000ha, Ombujongwe 7500ha, Joumbira 4000ha & Marathon 4500ha.

The 22 000ha property includes:

The Tusk Trust Rehabilitation Park: 4000ha (10 000 acres)
A 2000 ha area which includes - Main & Bush Camp, Bush Suite & PAWS & The Omboroko Campsite
The 16 000ha Private Nature Reserve – completed MAY 2010!!
The 4000ha and the 16 000ha will merge and become 20 000ha – end 2011

NB: PLEASE TAKE NOTE OF THE FOLLOWING! THIS INFORMATION IS IMPORTANT TO READ:

OKONJIMA is in a Malaria–Free area.
In order to be in time for the afternoon activities, a general guide for arrival times is before 15h00 (winter) and 16h00 (summer).
Check–in from 12h00. Guests are respectfully requested not to arrive before 12h00 and to please vacate their rooms at Main & Bush Camp on the day of departure by 10h00 at the very latest! Villa and Suite guests should please vacate their rooms by 11h00. The only time an 'exception' can be made is when Okonjima is not expecting any new arrivals!
okonjima-activity-animals 051

Viewing of leopards is NOT guaranteed, and the leopards, as well as the cheetahs/Hyaenas in the Rehabilitation Nature Reserves are radio–collared to allow for regular monitoring of their well–being and for research purposes!
An increasing number of tourism lodges are holding cheetahs and other wild animals in captivity for entertainment purposes. More than 10 years ago OKONJIMA decided to set an example to discourage this activity by withdrawing cheetahs from appearing for guests on the lawn in front of the lodge.
 
Children under the age of 12 years are not permitted at Bush Camp, and The Villa.
 
Children under the age of 7 years are not permitted at Main Camp.
 
Children under the age of 12 years are permitted at the private Bush Suite & The Omboroko Campsite, but the guardians are expected to sign a special 'children's indemnity' to make them aware of the dangers and rules concerning children. No 'nanny service' is available at either of the Camps.
 
Due to the nature of our activities, child participation is restricted.
 
Electricity is available 24 hours (220 Volt). 2 & 3 prong adapters/outlets (South African format) are available in all tents/rooms/chalets/suites to charge cameras, laptops etc.
 
Due to unforeseen power–cuts, especially during the rainy season, OKONJIMA has installed new generators at all Camps. (excl The Omboroko Campsite & PAWS)
 
Parking: All 4 lodges have under–roof parking for private vehicles. No allocated parking spaces at the Omboroko Campsite.
OKONJIMA is bordered by rivers, which are dry for most of the year. However your guests are advised to check on accessibility during the rainy season! During 2008/2009 – we had 1/2 our annual rainfall in just 5 days!!!
 
Photographers are advised that the leopards and the rehabilitated cheetahs & Hyaenas in the 'Rehabilitation Areas' have been fitted with radio–collars for monitoring and research purposes. All cats that form part of the Welfare Project are NOT radio–collared.
 
CELL Phones: Certain areas on OKONJIMA have cell–phone reception. Guests are respectfully requested to keep their cell–phones off at ALL times unless they are making a call or relaxing inside their private room. No cell–phones, IPods, MP3 players, disc–men etc are permitted, whilst on an activity!
okonjima-activity-animals 034

PROTECT OUR ENVIRONMENT:

Water is a rare commodity in Namibia! Please inform your guests to not use unnecessary amounts of water!

OKONJIMA is known for its excellent water quality and The Villa has been fitted with a water softener.

The tap water in your guest's room is safe to drink, however for people with a delicate constitution; we would recommend bottled water from the bar!
 
Please advise your guests to use litter bins for their litter and cigarette ends.
 
Please advise your guests to switch off lights, fans & air/heating facilities when leaving their room. All these commodities add to the carbon tracks each guest leaves behind.

PAYMENT CONDITIONS:

Credit card payments can take a while to process, due to 'bush'–telephone lines and slow connections. To ensure a swift departure – payments can be done the evening before departure or during brunch on their day of departure. Please ask your guests to be patient! Banks often require strict security checks!

On credit card payments guests may be required to present the following information:

Name of their local Bank, their mother's maiden name, their street address, passport number and credit card. (Visa & Master credit cards are all accepted) Guests are also welcome to add tips to their final credit card payment, stating how much they wish to spend on tips.
OKONJIMA also accepts cash payments in the following currencies: US Dollars, Euros, British Pounds, and South African Rands.
okonjima-activity-animals 019
THE PARK FEE

The Okonjima Nature Reserve is a privately–managed protected area of 22 000 hectares.

This conservation area is located in the heart of Namibia's commercial farmlands and requires sensitive land–management practices. The expanded nature reserve carries a considerable amount of daily maintenance beyond the usual lodge management activities.

There are 8 permanent reserve staff members tasked with managing the numerous waterholes, 104 kilometres of fence–line, an expansive network of wilderness trails and the grassland management programme. The field team is also critically involved in AfriCat's predator monitoring programme.

The small daily park fee of N$175.00 per person is designed to help cover some of the associated costs for the reserve.
SAFETY & SECURITY:

All guests are asked to sign a 'disclaimer of liability' on check–in and this is a condition of all guests staying with us. If your client has any problems with this indemnity, they should please discuss it with the lodge manager, Tristan Boehme or the Hanssen Family.

A basic first–aid kit is provided on every game vehicle, as well as at all base Camps.
 
The closest private hospital to OKONJIMA is MediCity - located in Otjiwarongo, a 50 minute drive away or 15 minutes by air, for those guests who have a chartered aircraft parked at OKONJIMA'S airstrip.
 
Emergency, paramedic assistance and air evacuation are covered by OKONJIMA'S Public Liability insurance
OKONJIMA has security check–points at 4 different areas along the entrance road, so that all incoming or out–going traffic is accounted for.
 
The security guards are in radio and cell–phone contact with the lodge 24/7.
 
All rooms are fitted with "panic buttons''. Alarms are monitored from a secure control room, which is also operational 24/7. At the moment a mobile security team patrol all 5 camps throughout the night.
 
Future security: It would be detrimental to explain, in fine detail, the security arrangements of Okonjima. However, to allay any fears of client security in the future, Okonjima has installed an 85km, state of the art, electrified boundary, supported by a complex system of sophisticated infra–red and daylight camera's which will encompass the whole property and be alarmed and monitored 24:7 (by 2011)
 
The Camps on OKONJIMA are not fenced off from the surrounding bushveld, and everyone should be aware at all times that they are in a private reserve where predators and other wild animals roam freely. Guests are warned not to approach any animals unless accompanied by an OKONJIMA guide.
 
Guests are advised not to roam freely around at night, unless accompanied by a member of the 'Okonjima Family'. It is however, safe to walk to and from their room/chalet with a flash light/ torch. On request and if guests so require, someone will escort them back to their room or chalet after dark.
 
We have first class fire–fighting apparatus, including our own fire engine. All rooms/chalets/suites are fitted with manual fire hydrants and portable fire–extinguishers.
okonjima-activity-animals 023

RATES:

See website for The Omboroko Campsite, Main Camp and Bush Camp's rates: www.okonjima.com

Contact OKONJIMA LODGE directly for The Villa and Bush Suite's rates.
 
Cancellation fees are applicable.
 
Main Camp & Bush Camp offer a Full Board (FB) rate which includes all activities and all meals. Drinks and extras such as curios are not included.
 
Main Camp & Bush Camp also offer a Half Board (HB) rate (Dinner, Bed and Breakfast), but all activities, lunch and drinks are excluded. Activities are available at an additional cost.
 
The Villa, Bush Suite and The Omboroko Campsite offer ALL INCLUSIVE RATES ONLY.
 
PAYMENT CONDITIONS: Pre–payment or otherwise agreed upon. Payment either via Bank Deposit or Credit Card Transaction.

WHAT TO BRING WITH YOU:

Your guests should ALWAYS bring a flash light / torch with them when visiting Africa!
 
A 'headlight' is always more convenient.

Hat & sunglasses (polarized for those long, bright road trips)
 
Sunscreen (SPF 45+)
 
Re–hydrate and do not forget to remind your guests to drink as much water as possible. (Recommendation: at least 2 litres a day)
 
During the winter months (mid May - mid Sept) do not forget to remind your guests to bring along warm clothing! Namibia can get very cold. (see SEASONS section)
 
A basic first aid kit; including medication against diarrhoea, nausea, headaches, heat stroke, stomach cramps, broad–spectrum antibiotics, mosquito repellent, Nasal Vaseline thus preventing nosebleeds, antihistamine cream, aspi–venom for bites and stings, if possible, as well as sufficient prescription medication.

URGENT STATEMENT!

An increasing number of tourism lodges are holding cheetahs, leopards and other wild animals in captivity for entertainment purposes. OKONJIMA supports the conservation of wild animals IN THEIR NATURAL HABITAT and has set an example by withdrawing cheetahs from appearing on the lawn in front of the lodge.

The practice of catching cheetahs in the wild for captivity is causing a drain on the wild population. Revenue earned through showing these captive cheetahs at lodges rarely goes back into conservation practices. THE AFRICAT FOUNDATION has also had to take on a large number of unwanted cheetahs, when lodge owners or farmers decide that they are not worth keeping.

It is OKONJIMA'S long–term aim, to encourage viewing of large carnivores in the wild, rather than in a captive environment and cheetahs on the lawn and direct human–animal contact – are detrimental to this long–term approach.

Guests visiting OKONJIMA will still be visiting THE AFRICAT FOUNDATION and learning about large carnivores in the wild like cheetah, leopard and lion, but in a constructive manner.
SEASONS:

Either Main Camp OR Bush Camp – The Villa OR Bush Suite are closed during certain periods in December, January & February each year for maintenance and upgrading.

Please contact OKONJIMA to confirm closing dates.

WINTER: June to August: Early morning, evening and night–time temperatures can drop below freezing; temperatures of – 4°C to – 6°C have often been recorded. (The lowest temperature ever recorded on OKONJIMA was –18°C). Please make sure that your guests bring along warm clothing such as jackets, (preferably down as well as a wind–breaker) a beanie, gloves, warm trousers and comfortable closed shoes or boots.

NO indoor heating is provided at any of the Camps.

For your guests comfort, Bush Camp and Main Camp provide gas heaters at meal times and water bottles are placed in the beds before they retire at night.

All open, game–viewing vehicles carry windproof blankets.

The Villa and Bush Suite each have a fire–place in the dining/lounge area and rooms are fitted with heating facilities.
If the wind does not blow – the days are beautiful, warm and sunny. The mornings and evenings can get very cold. (0 celcius or below!)

SUMMER: September to May: The day–time temperatures can be high during October, November, December and January! Rain is expected from January to April, but can start in December during a good year. [September can suddenly get cold] Temperatures vary from 20°C up to approximately 38°C.

OKONJIMA'S average rainfall is approximately 450mm. During the 2006 wet season OKONJIMA had a 1000mm of rain.

Please note that Namibia can get very wet during certain rainfall seasons, and the dry rivers beds can turn into raging water traps! A large part of Namibia is arid and the air is very dry. Please ensure that your guests are advised to drink plenty of water every day! (Recommendation: at least 2 litres a day)

A hat, sunscreen (SPF 45+), loose, light, cotton clothing, sunglasses and re–hydrate, are also recommended. It is advisable to participate in the activities on offer during the early morning hours or late afternoon. A 'siesta' is recommended between 12h00 - 15h00; the hottest part of the day!
NEED to know. . .

Okonjima is a family run business. Wayne, Donna and Rosalea Hanssen who co–own and live on the property, bought Okonjima from their parents in 1993 – turning, what was then a cattle farm, into a 22 000ha private conservation project.

Tammy Hoth - nee HANSSEN joined the AfriCat family by merging her foundation AFRI–LEO with The AfriCat Foundation in April 2010. Her human–wildlife conflict project is now called AfriCat NORTH. AfriCat North is based on Kaross Farm, bordering western ETOSHA NATIONAL PARK.

AfriCat Northwest on Kaross farm – strives to mitigate human–wildlife conflict thereby reducing poverty, to keep lions in their natural habitat, to prevent the exploitation and inhumane treatment of lions and to ensure that captive populations are well cared for.

The programme's projects focus on medium to long term workable solutions through education, improved livestock management and protection, and research and monitoring.

AfriCat on OKONJIMA will focus on ISLAND–BOUND rehabilitation & research in the 22 000ha Private Nature Reserve; rescue and release, environmental education and carnivore welfare.

SEE OKONJIMA FAST FACTS for more detailed information about:

    the different Camps
    the activities offered
    the one and two–day programmes
 
 
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Last Updated on Friday, 07 September 2012 11:53

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