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Last Updated on Sunday, 19 July 2015 08:38

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killi 2013The AfriCat Hobatere Lion Research Project

Hobatere Lion Research Proposal, Tammy Hoth-Hanssen, AfriCat Foundation.
Title: Conduct a study of the Lion (Panthera leo) population within the Hobatere Concession Area and movements between the Hobatere Concession Area, western Etosha National Park and adjacent communal farmland.

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wildlife waterhole droughtDrought - A Natural Cycle but for Farmers its about Survival not Conservation

Namibia is known as the 'dry country', where farmers were once familiar with its regular, dry cycles managing their livestock numbers and crops accordingly; many remember the '80's drought' during which thousands of cattle died of thirst and hunger, especially in north-western Namibia, commonly known as Kaokoveld. Some commercial farmers were forced to sell their land and animals, others managed to purchase 'drought-relief' farms where they survived by keeping only the toughest stock, relieved when the rains returned. Thereafter, for at least a decade (2000-2010), most regions were blessed with regular if not above-average rainfall, providing much-needed relief, also increasing their herd numbers in the hope that these weather patterns would remain.

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mj cub july 2013MJ - Legendary cat in the Okonjima Nature Reserve

On the evening of October 1st, MJ was sighted by one of our guides with heavy head wounds, indicating a leopard attack. The AfriCat team was called in to dart her with an anesthetic and bring her into the clinic for a check up. The wounds were cleaned, blood samples taken, teeth and claws inspected and antibiotics given to prevent infection. After two hours of sedation, a deep growl indicated her waking up, and she was quickly put back in a crate. She was released at dawn in the same area she was attacked.

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running-cheetahWhen the Heat is on the Cheetah is Cool

A COLLABORATIVE STUDY BY THE UNIVERSITY OF THE WITWATERSRAND, SOUTH AFRICA, THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN AUSTRALIA AND THE AFRICAT FOUNDATION, NAMIBIA: Why Do Cheetahs Give Up the Hunt? It’s a Myth That Cheetahs Overheat While Hunting - ONE of the most prevalent myths in animal biology has been debunked, with scientists proving cheetahs don't abandon hunts because they overheat. - Cheetah hunt theory disproved - Cheetah Agility More Important Than Speed - When the heat is on, the cheetah is cool - Long-Held Myth About Cheetahs Busted: HEADLINES ACROSS THE GLOBE ABOUT RESEARCH DONE AT THE AFRICAT FOUNDATION:

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lion sideview A Namibia without Lions

Can you imagine Namibia without Lions, if we had lost all of our lions to persecution, illegal trade and unsustainable off-take? Some farmers might say good riddance, others may be indifferent, but I am convinced that the majority of Namibians would regret not having done more to ensure the lions’ long-term survival. World Lion Day, was celebrated globally on 10 August 2013, and presented the perfect opportunity for the world to take note of the plight of the African Lion, for us all to take the time to ponder the reality of today’s pressures on wildlife and the wilderness sustaining these wondrous animals who have, to date, stood the test of time – but for how long will they be able to run from Man?

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science blood takingAfriCat, Science and Research

Einstein once wrote "The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the source of all true art and all science. He to whom this emotion is a stranger, who can no longer pause to wonder and stand rapt in awe, is as good as dead: his eyes are closed", and so it was with a strong desire not to die, but to continue to attempt to unravel the mysteries of Namibia’s large carnivores, that the reconstituted AfriCat Scientific Committee met on the 30th of June 2013.

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ee 2013 learningAfriCat Environmental Education Program 2013

Half Yearly Report
The following is a report on the progress and activities that the AfriCat Environmental Education Program has been involved in since March 2013 at AfriCat HQ. The AfriCat North Environmental Education Centre is currently on hold for 2013 due to re-location. It includes all the schools that have visited the center, as well as the groups that have been booked and confirmed up to the 15th of December 2013. These include both high school and primary schools, ranging from grade one up to grade twelve. We have also hosted a number of environmental clubs as well as a group of main stream teachers coming from the northern region of our country. It also includes the plans for the future, and on how we are hoping to grow the project to reach and involve more children in our EE program.

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hyena pooh2Sightings Stats for our 'Medium' Season, May - July, 2013

This report records the total number of carnivore sightings in the reserve from 1 May to 31 July 2013. A total of 276 leopard sightings was recorded, which include the majority of resident, territorial leopards present in the reserve. The remaining sightings of the carnivores that are part of the rehabilitation project totalled 213. These included the cheetah, hyaena and wild dogs.

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Penta and Needle together againPenta and Cubs - The quandary of rescue and release.

HOW IT ALL STARTED
Late last year, a beautiful mother cheetah and her five cubs were caught about 25 km north-east of Grootfontein on the farm Paarl belonging to Mr Jos van Zyl. The area she inhabited was invaded by thorny acacias and she had probably shared her territory with leopard, brown hyaena and even wild dog at some time or another. She had been in the area for a while and three farmers were after her as she had apparently been catching some livestock, but mostly game. She was caught in early December 2012 at one of the cattle posts and when the more than usually compassionate farmer realized that she had cubs, he set additional traps and caught all five of them.

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wildlife contraceptive methodsContraception in Wildlife

The ideal contraceptive for wildlife should have no side effects. It should be safe, also in pregnant females, have minimal effects on behaviour, should not pass through the food chain, be affordable and delivery should be easy – ideally allow remote delivery. In many cases a reversible method is preferable to permanent methods so that animals can breed again at a later stage.

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cheetah anestheticThe AfriCat 2013 Dental and Health Check

Successful start to a new, long-term research and health monitoring programme.

The 2013 annual health checks on the large cats at AfriCat kicked off on the 25th of June this year under the direction of Dr Adrian Tordiffe from the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa. With help from Namibian vet, Dr Mark Jago and veterinarians Dr Sally Hardie & Dr Lucinda from the UK, in-depth health examinations were carried out on 40 captive cheetahs & 3 rehabilitated cheetahs, 4 captive leopards & 1 wild leopard, 6 lions and 2 caracals.

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chris packham cheetahAfriCat accompanies Chris Packham’s 'Wild Night Out' tour.

Chris Packham has been an AfriCat supporter for many years and has taken many of his iconic photographs of big cats whilst staying at Okonjima, home of the AfriCat foundation. During March this year he set off on his 'Wild Night Out' tour of the UK and asked AfriCat to come along. Chris is renowned for his passion about wildlife and his ability to enthuse others and entertain them at the same time. During his live shows he is able to talk about his own passions and possibly take a more controversial stance than he is able to do during his TV work. At each theatre destination he had invited specific wildlife organisations he supports to come along. They could take the opportunity to speak with the wildlife enthusiasts attending his show and raise awareness of their work.

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leopard on okonjimaRescue and Release - Does it work?

Lions were rescued from certain death off farmland adjacent to Etosha by the AfriCat north Team in 2012; the same lions were recently seen with a heavily pregnant female in a park west of Etosha, their new territory. Leopards were collared and released in non-conflict zones and a farmer agrees to the release of a conflict leopard in her original home range; AfriCat monitors her whereabouts regularly. A Cheetah female and 5 cubs cage-trapped by a farmer in December 2012 and AfriCat is called for assistance and advice; these wild-caught cheetah will soon be released in the Okonjima 20 000 ha Nature Reserve with a good chance of survival, but also because no other suitable relocation site has been found as to date.

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chris packham pangolinChris Packham Supports AfriCat

As a wildlife enthusiast I am constantly concerned by the struggle we face in the battle to roll back the negative impacts that humans make on the world’s natural heritage. We are all aware of those horrific images of shark finning, tiger poaching, and savagely de-horned rhino corpses which point firmly to an impending extinction scenarios for these and so many other species. The survival prognosis for so many of the world’s natural treasures is frighteningly grim. But in truth, for every tragic situation in animal conservation there is often an uplifting success story to counter its sadness. As impassioned and motivated individuals it is our responsibility to enthusiastically support those initiatives which are capable of making a marked and sustainable contribution to species preservation and, more importantly, that are doing it right now. Before it’s too late.

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dizzy and cubsFirst Cheetah Cubs Born Wild in the Okonjima Nature Reserve!

In June 2012, female cheetahs Dizzy and Dash, along with three males, Baxter, Ruff and Tumble, were released into the 200 sq. km. Okonjima Nature Reserve.
Sadly, Baxter was killed by a Spotted Hyena only a short time after their release. He was the weakest of the coalition, always lagging behind, and was not especially alert.
All came to AfriCat during 2008, and the five grew up together at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre. When they arrived, 8 month old Dizzy came along with month-old siblings Ruff, Tumble, and Dash from the Windhoek area, whilst 6 month old Baxter came from the Okahandja area. When caught, both Dizzy and Baxter were alone, without their mother or any siblings.

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cheetah face close upAfriCat's Footprint in the United Kingdom

Note from AfriCat's Chairman:
The AfriCat Foundation in Namibia has worked tirelessly since 1993 to save the lives of Namibia’s large carnivores and work for their long term conservation. This has always been, and remains, our fundamental principle. The good work of the AfriCat Foundation has been made possible only through the generosity of visitors and supporters. Update on AfriCat UK: In 2012 AfriCat UK’s board of trustees was reconstituted, with the Chairman of the AfriCat Foundation in Namibia, Mark Reinecke, joining David Farquharson and long-time AfriCat UK supporter Carey Widdows as trustees. AfriCat UK has a dedicated and passionate board, working to raise AfriCat’s profile and awareness within the United Kingdom, as well as setting about establishing fund raising initiatives which are scalable and make an immediate impact upon AfriCat’s good work in Namibia.

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wild dogThe Namibia Wild Dog Research Project

The proposed Namibia Wild Dog Research Project Proposal was submitted to the Ministry of Environment & Tourism (MET) end 2010 - for the necessary permission and is the first collaborative effort between the Namibia Nature Foundation (NNF), N/a’an ku se Foundation and AfriCat. The selected study site (Kavango Cattle Ranch and Mangetti National Park) is situated in the Kavango Region along the boundary between commercial farmland and Kavango communal farmland, to the east of the Etosha National Park. The study area includes about 40 farms and covers approximately 200 000 hectares, where wild dog packs are regularly sighted and farmer-predator conflict threatens their long-term survival.

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africat education talkAfriCat's 2013 Environmental Education Programme

2013 Marked the rejuvenation of the AfriCat envrionmental education programme.
For the past 3 years most of the Environmental Education has been fairly slow and irregular due to the lack of funding as well as a permanent Environmental Educator. During the last quarter of 2012 AfriCat was able to secure funding via TUSK. Thanks to the TUSK Trust for a permanent Environmental Educator! This enabled us to start up again and so the AfriCat Environmental Education Programme is back on track! Since March we have had the pleasure of hosting 3 consecutive Environmental Education camps.

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cheetah researchA new approach to disease research in cheetahs at AfriCat.

There are about 8 to 12 thousand cheetahs left in the wild, and an estimated 1 400 in captivity, worldwide. The captive cheetahs therefore make up a significant proportion of the total world population and are becoming increasingly important as numbers in the wild continue to decline. In captivity, however, cheetahs are known to suffer from a number of unusual chronic diseases possibly caused by stress, nutritional imbalances, low genetic diversity or lack of exercise (or a combination of these). Over the last 20 to 30 years researchers have made little progress in developing a good understanding of the causes of these diseases.

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the siblingsTONGS – OUR MOST SUCCESSFUL SINGLE, FEMALE CHEETAH.
THE INFAMOUS 'SIBLINGS', COCO, SPUD & BONES!

On the 18th May 2010, five Cheetahs were released in the Okonjima 20 000ha Nature Reserve – four males, Frankie, Hammer, Spud and Bones and a female, Coco.
We call them 'The Siblings', but actually they are a collection of siblings . . .  Frankie, Spud and Coco are siblings, and arrived at AfriCat, along with Bones, in 2006 as orphaned cubs. In similar circumstances, Hammer arrived with his sister, Tongs, a year earlier. After four years in captivity they had their yearly veterinary check-up and were collared. It was time for the Cheetahs to make their own life in the reserve!
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5 otjenova kraal

Spots visit to AfriCat March 2013.

Simone Eckhard, founder of Stichting SPOTS and passionate conservationist, spent the Easter weekend in the drought-stricken communal farmlands of Namibia’s northwest, happy to see the fruits of her fund-raising efforts standing proudly as a large community kraal (boma) for the protection of livestock from marauding predators, especially lion.

Simone and her team have raised large sums since 2010, in support of AfriCat’s Livestock Protection Programme; kraals, GPS Satellite collars and more recently a 5-tonne Truck, which will soon find its way over rocky, two-track roads into these farming communities bringing much-needed fencing material and supplies.

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waterhole

Applications of Technology in the Conservation and Counter-Conservation World.

Technology has come a long way over the last couple of decades; appearing to progress at an ever increasing rate, it is hard to keep abreast of the latest advances in phones, laptops, cameras or TVs. Not only are new products being developed, the application of these products in a growing number of fields and scenarios is escalating, with surprising uses and innovative problem solving visible in perhaps unlikely places. Within the conservation sphere, certain technologies have enabled protection to become much more efficient and accessible. Using GPS data, geographical information systems (GIS) and motion-sensitive cameras (amongst other things) effective methods of tracking, monitoring and data analysis are now used which save on time, man power and therefore money.

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charlie nigelConservation in Namibia.

DAILY TELEGRAPH March 2013 Nigel Richardson joins Charlie Mayhew, the founder of Tusk Trust, for a closer look at his wildlife conservation projects in the safari camps of Namibia. By Nigel Richardson.

At the AfriCat Foundation, the challenge is how to enable humans and big cats to live peaceably alongside each other – an especially vexatious question in a country with a quarter of the world’s cheetah population, of which 90 per cent live on farmland and are automatically perceived as a threat to cattle. AfriCat, and the safari business that supports it, Okonjima, are run by the charismatic Hanssen family – a sort of khaki Swiss Family Robinson, bursting with good looks and conviction.

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africat lionAfriCat North Lions go south - to their new home @ AfriCat on Okonjima.

The decision to close the AfriCat North Lion Sanctuary on Farm Kaross came when the farm was sold at the end of 2012. AfriCat North’s new base will be established close-by and with the ever-increasing pressures to find workable solutions to the farmer-predator conflict, to escalate our lion research and monitoring programmes as well as to continue with our Environmental Education outreach in Namibia’s communal conservancies, it was decided that our 4 lions (Kilimanjaro, Shavula, Shenzi & Thimba) and one leopard (Lewa) would join the other 'ambassadors' at the AfriCat Carnivore Care Centre on Okonjima.

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africat collared lionCheetah Rescue and AfriCat Collared Lion Spotted . . .

Werda Cheetah Rescue and Collared lion seen at Hobatere waterhole

As Sydney passed through the Veterinary control point at Werda Gate, en-route to mitigate lion conflict on farmland north of the Hobatere border, a group of villagers excitedly told of a cheetah lying under the bridge ahead.

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Last Updated on Thursday, 09 January 2014 13:47

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Health Check Process

raisin the cheetahcheetah healthcheckhealthcheck spice 333pxh

As part of AfriCat's commitment to the welfare of the animals in their care, they have carried out an annual health examination of all large carnivores. This is not only good practice, but is highly recommended by the Ministry of Environment and Tourism as part of its permit process.

In some cases a visual examination is all that is required whilst those that have to be anethetised for another reason, are given their examinations during anaesthesia. Those animals requiring anaesthesia are darted with an anaesthetic dart gun and brought to the AfriCat veterinary clinic.

Older animals are then transferred to an inhalation anaesthetic machine. All animals are given an intravenous drip and continuously monitored both clinically and by the use of a pulse oximeter. Cats are idendified by means of a unique sub-cutaneous microchip, examined, and any abnormalities are treated either on the spot or plans made to treat in future.

On completion of the examination, animals are transferred to a recovery box, prior to being released back into their camps once fully recovered. Captive breeding is not permitted in Namibia. Therefore AfriCat is using a novel contraceptive sub-cutaneous implant as part of it's "family planning" strategy. This contraception has not only been highly successful but has also given an opportunity over the years for some "state of the art" research carried out by Professor Bertschinger from Onderstepoort Veterinary Faculty, Pretoria, South Africa. This involves collection of vaginal smears and of semen to monitor the effectiveness of this contraceptive method.

On occasion a veterenary ophthalmologist examines the cats' eyes for any form of pathology. Such examinations have led to professional publications on common abnormalities seen in captive cheetah in Namibia.

Teeth are also examined and any abnormalities recorded for subsequent scheduling of treatment by a veterninary dentist.

When necessary an endoscopic examination is carried out and gastric biopsies collected allowing the monitoring of gastritis caused by Helicobacter pylori, a common bacterial organism which can, if untreated, lead to clinical signs in captive cheetah.

Over the years a number of other scientists have been afforded the opportunity by the annual health examinations to collect data for a range of scientific studies and subsequent publications.

Where necessary blood samples are taken to further investigate any suspected abnormalities. All large predators are vaccinated against: Feline Panleukopenia, Rhinotracheitis, Calici Virus, Feline Leukemia and rabies.

They are also de-wormed, treated for ectoparasites, and weighed.

 

wayne preparing drug for dart

1) The vet draws the drug for the dart. The amounts of different drug are determined by the weight of the cat as the drugs are given by mg of drug/kg of cat.

vet dartgun

2) The vet prepares to put the smooth needle dart, which has no barb, into the dart gun which is propelled by compressed air, adjusted to the correct pressure required for the distance that the dart is required to travel.

vet darting

3) The night before the cat is going to be darted it is moved from its large enclosure into a holding area where it can be darted easily. The vet darts the cat in the shoulder as the dart is less likely to bounce off and the dart will not harm the cat.

collecting darted cheetah

4) The vet approaches the darted cat after the drug has taken significant effect in about 10 - 15 minutes although this varies depending on the cat and the drug. It is advisable to approach a cheetah with more than one person as it will be less likely to attack.

cheetah lifted onto vehicle

5) The cheetah is lifted into the vehicles where it will be placed on a canvassed mattress. This may be covered in wet towels if it gets hot.

temperature taking

6) The temperature is taken and monitored throughout the process but particularly as it is picked up, as when it was darted it may have been lying in the sun.

cheetah tongue

7) The tongue is pulled out to prevent it from being swallowed and blocking breathing.

cat weighed

8) The cat is weighed for medical history records and to check for significant weight loss and to make sure that the medication given to it is correct for its weight.

tail tag

9) A tail tag is given to the cat to help with identification when it is on the table and when it is put in the crate so that cats are not confused and to save time determining which cat is which.

monitor

10) This machine monitors the cat’s heart rate, breathing (respiratory) rate, systolic and diastolic (blood) pressure, temperature, oxygen and carbon dioxide levels.

monitor oxygen levels

11) This machine is used to monitor the cat's heart rate and oxygen levels.

health process

12) A tube is put into the easily accessible vein in the leg to give intravenous fluids and maintain blood pressure.

blood samples

13) Samples of blood are taken from each cat with purple tubes containing cells and red and yellow tubes containing everything else. This blood will be used to check the cats health and for genetic testing.

cleaning cheetah fur

14) Burrs, grass and dirt are removed from the cheetah's fur as they are not clean cats and don't remove this from their fur themselves.

turning the cats

15) The cat must be turned over as the dentist can only work on one side at a time. It must be turned over in this way to allow any liquids in the mouth to fall out and to prevent the intestine from twisting.

vet listening  to the heart

16) The vet listens to the cat's heart to check if its functioning correctly.

keeping cheetah cool

17) The cheetah is covered in a wet towel and sprayed with cold water to prevent it from getting too hot as a cheetah will die at 42 degrees and their average temperature is 38, so it is important to never let them get hotter than 40 degrees.

anaesthetic

18) A tube is put into the cat to give anaesthetic and provide it with air to breathe.

testicles measured

19) The testicles are measured as some contraceptive measures can cause them to shrink, so they must be monitored throughout the length of time that the measure is in place.

protecting the eyes

20) The eyes are covered as some drugs don't let the eyes close and prevent tear production so this stops things going into the eye and protects it from light. Eye drops are given to prevent the eye from drying out.

checking stomach

21) The vet is checking for stomach ulcers and other stress related stomach problems as this can cause a cat a large amount of pain.

eye examination

22) The vet examines the eye and looks for ocular trauma ranging from mild scarring of the lids and cornea, through to mature cataracts, severe endophthalmitis and phthisisbulbi.

checking teeth

23) The teeth are checked for infections, abscesses, ulcers and cracks that may be dealt with at the health check or a date in the near future when a vet specialised in dentistry is available.

ultrasound

24) An ultrasound is done on a cat before a contraceptive implant is put in to see if she is pregnant.

ultrasound

25) This is what an ultrasound looks like on screen. If the cat was pregnant the embryos would be seen.

checking wounds

26) The cat is checked for any cuts, wounds or bites that may need cleaning and treating.

cat herpes

27) This cat has cat herpes which need to be treated and antibiotics given after. As this is very difficult and if there is little chance of curing the herpes it is better for the cat to be euthanized.

wounds disinfected

28) Any cuts or wounds will be disinfected before stitching to avoid infection and kill any bacteria which are present

wounds stitched

29) Any wounds will be stitched up after they have been cleaned to prevent infection and treat the problem.

eye treatment

30) The eye is examined to see what must be done to treat it.

eye problems

31) These are some kinds of eye problems that the cats may have.

eye injection

32) The eye is injected to reduce pain.

surgery eye stitched

33) After surgery the eye is stitched up to avoid bleeding and infection.

collar fitting

34) If necessary a new collar is fitted to the cat if the battery is low or the collar has worn away.

powder

35) Powder is put on the cheetah to deter parasitic cheetah flies.

recovery crate

36) Once the dental work is over the cat is put into a recovery crate where it will be given the antidote and watched until it wakes up to make sure it recovers correctly and breathing continues normally.

release cheetah

37) Once the cat has recovered it will be released back into its enclosure.

samples for research and testing

38) After the health check some samples may be checked for problems in cats where a disease is suspected. The samples may also be used for research.

Dental Check Process 

dentalcheckdental check dental check

Within a big cat's mouth three different types of teeth all work together to enable a rapid eating style. The large pointed teeth are called the canines. They’re also known as eye teeth or fangs. They’re designed for gripping and holding, and help the cat to suffocate its prey.

With the Cheetah - although effective, the canines are small compared to those of other big cats because everything about the cheetah is designed to enhance its amazing running speed. Running fast requires large amounts of oxygen, and to breathe in lots of oxygen the cheetah needs very large nasal passages. This doesn’t leave much space for long canine roots.

The front teeth, known as incisors, are used for quickly skinning the prey. This helps the cat to get access to the protein-rich flesh as fast as possible. Finally, behind the canines are the carnassials, also known as pre-molars or back teeth. The carnassials work in a scissor-like fashion to help shear off large pieces of meat, which are then often swallowed whole.

However, a big cat’s teeth are not the only tool it has in its armoury when it comes to eating swiftly. Big Cats have a rasp-like tongue covered in small hard spines called papillae. These give the tongue a sandpapery quality which helps to remove the meat from the bones.

 

vet draws dart drug

1) The vet draws the drug for the dart. The amounts of different drug are determined by the weight of the cat as the drugs are given by mg of drug/kg of cat.

vet draws dart drug

2) The vet prepares to put the smooth needle dart, which has no barb, into the dart gun which is propelled by compressed air, adjusted to the correct pressure required for the distance that the dart is required to travel.

cat about to be darted

3) The night before the cat is going to be darted it is moved from its large enclosure into a holding area where it can be darted easily. The vet darts the cat in the shoulder as the dart is less likely to bounce off and the dart will not harm the cat.

vet approaching a darted cat

4) The vet approaches the darted cat after the drug has taken significant effect in about 10 - 15 minutes although this varies depending on the cat and the drug. It is advisable to approach a cheetah with more than one person as it will be less likely to attack.

carrying cat to the vehicle

5) The cat is carried to the vehicle to be transported back to the clinic. Cheetahs typically weigh between 30-50 kg while leopards can weigh between 32 – 60 kg.

putting the cat on the transport vehicle

6) The cat is lifted into the vehicles where it is placed on a canvassed mattress. This may be covered in wet towels if it gets hot to keep body temperatures as low as possible.

cats tongue

7) The tongue is pulled out to prevent it from blocking the air passage and inhibiting the cat’s breathing.

cat covered in wet towels

8) The cat is covered in a wet towel to prevent their body temperatures from getting too high as cheetahs will die at 42 degrees and their average temperature is 38 degrees, so it is important to never let them get hotter than 40 degrees.

cats eyes covered

9) The eyes are covered as some drugs don’t let the eyes close and prevent tear production so this stops foreign objects from entering in the eye and protects it from sunlight. Eye drops are given to prevent the eye from drying out.

cat temperature taking

10) The temperature is taken and monitored throughout the process but particularly as it is picked up as when it was darted it may have been lying in the sun.

cat being weighed

11) The cat is weighed for medical history records and to check for significant weight loss and to make sure that the medication given to it is correct for its weight.

cat taken to the clinic

12) The cheetah is quickly taken into the clinic to prepare it for dental work.

cat being given anaesthetic

13) A tube is inserted into the cat’s mouth and air passage to give anaesthetic and provide it with air to breathe.

tail tag for identification

14) A tail tag is given to the cat to help with identification when it is on the table and when it is put in the crate so that cats are not confused and to save time determining which cat is which.

monitoring machine

15) This machine monitors the cat’s heart rate, breathing (respiratory) rate, systolic and diastolic (blood) pressure, temperature, oxygen and carbon dioxide levels.

dentist examination

16) The dentist examines the mouth to look for problems such as infections and abscesses.

dentist cleans tartar from the cats teeth

17) The dentist cleans tartar off the cat’s teeth.

tooth removal

18) The dentist gives the cat a local anaesthetic before tooth removal. This can reduce pain for up to 6 hours.

tooth extraction

19) The dentist extracts the tooth as it has a root abscess.

cleaning the hole in the tooth

20) The dentist cleans out the hole where the tooth was removed to make sure the entire abscess is gone and there will be no further infection.

cat root canal

21) The dentist fills the root canal which was made in the cat’s tooth.

monitor

22) This machine is used to monitor the cat's heart rate and oxygen levels.

taking blood samples

23) Samples of blood are taken from each cat with purple tubes containing cells and red and yellow tubes containing everything else. This blood will be used to check the cats health and for genetic testing.

dental check process

24) A tube is put into the easily accessible vein in the leg to give intravenous fluids and maintain blood pressure.

dental check process

25) The cat must be turned over as the dentist can only work on one side at a time. It must be turned over in this way to allow any liquids in the mouth to fall out and to prevent the intestines from twisting.

powder to deter flies and ticks

26) Powder is put on the cheetah to deter parasitic cheetah flies & ticks.

recovery crate

27) Once the dental work is over the cat is put into a recovery crate where it will be watched until it wakes up to make sure it recovers correctly and breathing continues normally.

leopard release

28) Once the cat has fully recovered, it is released back into its enclosure.

   

AfriCat Annual Dental Procedures and Veterinary Assistance
FILMED AND EDITED BY ITV, UK - © itv 2010. Each year, the AfriCat Team including supporting Veterinarians, successfully undertake a Dental Check on the resident cheetah, leopard, lion & wild dog at our Carnivore Care Centre based in the Okonjima Nature Reserve. This way, AfriCat’s welfare, rehabilitation & carnivore programmes can assist long-term carnivore research, adding to the over-all conservation of the species. Also, when a carnivore is injured at AfriCat or in the Okonjima Nature Reserve – local vets assist wherever they can with emergencies.

 

 

MJ The leopard has a dental check.
Filmed by Wild Dog Productions Pty.

 

Last Updated on Friday, 12 May 2017 02:54

Hits: 13435

AfriCat Flyer

africat flyer march 2015

 

 

Last Updated on Monday, 02 March 2015 12:19

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