Africat.org

Switch to desktop

Downloads

leopard electra first litter okonjima nature reserve3Electra - A Leopard's Story So Far

Electra was collared in the 20,000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve on 7 May 2010, for tracking and research purposes. In the beginning she was skittish, shy of people and cars, and the guides hardly ever saw her. It was only in January 2013, since found mating with TJ and Nkosi, that Electra started to relax a bit. It could have been because both these males were so comfortable around vehicles. Leopards don’t have a defined birthing season and litters can arrive at any point during the year, although mating is more likely to occur in the months of January and February, which means that leopard litters typically arrive between April and May, as their gestation period is between 90 and 112 days.

Read More

 

brown hyena okonjima1'Behavioural ecology and management-induced niche shift of brown hyena in a closed reserve; implications for conservation management.'

Closed reserves are an increasingly common wildlife management strategy across southern Africa. They represent a practical solution to separate wildlife from surrounding human communities, thereby protecting both sides from threats such as human-wildlife conflict. However, the often small size of such reserves means they can represent a threat to the survival of species within them when natural processes such as emigration, immigrations and expansions of ranges are prohibited. This may ultimately lead to inbreeding depression and at an extreme level, local extinction. 

Read More

 

environmental education students cheetah watching4The AfriCat Environmental Education Report January - December 2017

The AfriCat Environmental Education Programme at Okonjima had a busy 2017, during which we interacted with nearly 600 learners, students and teachers. This included hosting Namibian primary and secondary learners at the Centre, as well a number of UNAM-initiated groups for practical training at the AfriCat Environmental Education Campsite. We also had visits from a number of international schools and colleges from the USA, UK, Poland and Italy, as well as a group of teachers from the Perivoli Schools from across Namibia.

Read More

 

walk4lifeWalk 4 Wildlife

Three intrepid AfriCat supporters braved the elements and took part in the Walk 4 Wildlife 2017 Night Walk in the New Forest that began at 10pm on Saturday evening 28th October and went through to 6am on Sunday morning. That was the time that it took to complete the 20 miles through England's newest National Park. Georgina, Andrea and Janet at the beginning of their 20 mile walk. The three were all raising money for AfriCat. Andrea and Janet had both grown up in the New Forest and felt it was the natural place for them to take part in the Walk 4 Wildlife 2017. Walk 4 Wildlife 2017 organised a number of events throughout the country for wildlife charities to raise money and publicity for them.

Read More

 

africat cheetahs mundi 3AfriCat Cheetahs - The Saltpans

In November 2013, two young orphaned cheetahs were found and rescued from the saltpans on the outskirts of Swakopmund. Locals detected the young cheetahs and instantly informed Swakopmund’s resident veterinarians Dr Rodenwoldt (AfriCat’s resident vet) and Dr Winterbach. The cubs were no older than six to seven months and were severely dehydrated and malnourished. After 24 hours of intensive care and observation, both cats were back on their feet and started eating and drinking on their own again. The AfriCat Foundation was contacted for assistance. After a further three days, the orphaned siblings were collected and transported to the AfriCat Headquarters where they were released into a small holding enclosure for the first few days to facilitate monitoring.

Read More

 

cheetahs tumble AfriCat Cheetahs - The Masters

Dash, Ruff and Tumble first came to AfriCat in 2008 at the age of one month and lived at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre for the following four years. In 2012 the sibling trio was released into Okonjima’s 20 000 ha nature reserve together with their coalition mates Dizzy and Baxter. Their rehabilitation process seemed promising in the beginning, as they started to hunt almost immediately after their release. After Baxter was killed not long after the release and Dizzy decided to lead a solitary life, the remaining trio only had sporadic hunting success and eventually became sedentary along the eastern boundary fence where game is sparse. 

Read More

 

africat cheetahs the aeroplanesAfriCat Cheetahs - The Aeroplane Coalition

The Aeroplane coalition – consisting of three males, Sniper, Spitfire and Quattro and their sister Hurricane – was released from the AfriCat Carnivore Care Centre into the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve at the beginning of December 2016. Spitfire and his sister Hurricane came to AfriCat in 2009 when they were about three months old. After their mother was shot, the two cubs were caught by a farmer, where they stayed for the following three weeks before AfriCat was contacted for assistance.Quattro was seven months old when he was hit by a car. The crash resulted in severe concussion and a broken leg. His front left leg was broken in four different places and needed to be pinned and plated in the Rhino Park Veterinary Clinic in Windhoek. After his major surgery, Quattro recovered from his injuries at AfriCat in a limited space enclosure to ensure that the bone could heal properly.

Read More

 

cheetah called dash okonjima The metabolic profiling of cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus): A systems biology approach to understanding the chronic diseases they suffer in captivity
In captivity, cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) are known to suffer from several chronic diseases that do not occur in their wild-living counterparts. These include lymphoplasmacytic gastritis, glomerulosclerosis, renal amyloidosis, veno-occlusive disease of the liver, adrenal hyperplasia and several ill-defined neurological disorders. Many factors have been proposed as possibly being the cause of this phenomenon – factors such as stress, lack of exercise, low genetic variability and the provision of unnatural diets in captive facilities - but to date convincing pathophysiological explanations for these diseases have been lacking or unsatisfactory. Doctor Adrian Tordiffe investigated this problem using a systems biology approach – in other words, he attempted to understand as many of the components of the cheeatah’s metabolic system as possible. 

Read More

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 19 May 2018 02:02

Hits: 1369

leopard ishara 2017Season Report 2017 - 1 December 2016 - 30 November 2017
The most sighted leopard in 2017 was Lila with 137 sightings. In the beginning of this year, Lila gave birth to her first litter. Leopards usually give birth to one or two cubs per litter, very rarely to three cubs. When Lila showed her cubs for the first time, we were delighted to see that she was accompanied by three little ones. Sadly two of her cubs disappeared within the next two months, most likely due to infanticide. Lila and her remaining third cub provided special sightings and we were hoping that she’d be able to protect it from all the danger and challenges of the wild. Unfortunately the love of a mother is not always enough: The little cub was found dead in September 2017. We unfortunately can’t confirm under what circumstances the little cub died, but strongly believe that it fell victim to an infanticidal male leopard. Due to malfunctioning of her collar, Lila was re-collared in October 2017 and was found to be in excellent condition.

Read More

 

flies on cheetahs 330px 2The Control of Cheetah Fly on Captive Carnivores
All captive carnivores at our Carnivore Care Centre were burdened with the Cheetah fly (Hippoboscus longipennis), which resulted in a drop in condition and erratic/aggressive behavior and required urgent investigation into long-term control of the problem. After looking at the flies’ life cycle, different options were considered to reduce the numbers, taking practicalities into consideration. The two options adopted were removing grass in holding camps, to interfere with the life cycle of the fly, and administering medication topically or orally. As there are no wild cat species-specific registered medicines available in Namibia, three commercial products (with varying treatment intervals) for the use in domesticated cats and dogs were used. Strict precautions were taken to ensure the well-being of the cats when using the medication.

Read More

 

dr gerhard steenkampAfriCat Annual Health Checks - 2017
This year the AfriCat Annual Health Check took place between 26 and 30 June, 2017. It was coordinated by Dr Adrian Tordiffe, Dr Gerhard Steenkamp and Dr Diethardt Rodenwoldt. They were assisted by Dr Roxanne Buck and Dr Gareth Zeiler, who were responsible for anaesthesia, and Dr Maria Geremek and student veterinarian Katarzyna Kolodziejczyk from Poland. A recently qualified vet, Dr Joel Alves, from Onderstepoort, University of Pretoria, who is currently working towards his Masters, also joined us from South Africa.

Read More

 

phase3 africat information centre6The Three Phases of AfriCat’s Carnivore Care & Information Centre
We’ve come a long way since afternoon tea with 'Chinga' on the lawn! From cheetah, lion and leopard rescue, care and release - TO rescue, rehabilitation, community support and research! From farmer support - TO 'Conservation Through Education'! We are committed to encouraging our youth and communities to ensure the survival of large carnivores, within a balanced ecosystem. Here at AfriCat, over the past two decades, the Rescue and Release Programme developed as a result of our relationship with the farming community. The 'Welfare and Carnivore Care Centre', in turn, was a by-product of the Rescue and Release Programme.

Read More

 

kuduOkonjima Lodge Game Count Information Summary Report: Game Count 11-13 October 2016
Some 38 years or longer ago conservationists already had a clear vision with the practicalities that can be encountered with Park Management and saw the necessity to perform game counts. In "Counting Animals" Norton-Griffith emphasizes: No form of wildlife management, whether it is the establishment of cropping or hunting quotas, the development of tourism or the demarcation of boundaries is possible without reliable information on the numbers, population dynamics and movements of the animals concerned. This account deals with many of the practical problems that are met with when designing and carrying out a wildlife census. (1)

Read More

 

electra1Season Report 2016 - 1 December 2015 to 30 November 2016
Nkozi was the most sighted male leopard during the year with 255 sightings. Even though he was occasionally spotted in his former ranges in the eastern part of the reserve, it seems as though he has shifted his hunting grounds mainly into the central-western parts. We believe this could be the result of high competition by other males in the area, although he now has to deal with younger challengers in his new ranges as well. However, exploitation of new areas has the advantage of new mating opportunities and Nkozi was seen mating regularly with Lila as well as Isaskia throughout the year.

Read More

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 16 December 2017 12:33

Hits: 5549

automated non invasive blood pressure monitors 450hComparison of High Definition Oscillometric & Direct Arterial Blood Pressure in Cheetahs

Like domestic cats, older cheetahs frequently suffer from chronic kidney disease and since the kidneys play an important role in the regulation of blood pressure, we have suspected for some time that these cheetahs may also develop a chronic rise in blood pressure (hypertension). Measuring blood pressure in a non-anaesthetised cheetah is however not without it's challenges. Automated non-invasive blood pressure monitors with an inflatable cuff, similar to those used in humans, can be applied to the tail or leg of a cheetah. Stress-free measurements are critical, since any elevation in stress levels would also lead to an increase in blood pressure, resulting in inaccurate readings. Captive cheetahs can be trained to calmly have their blood pressure measured with no or only minor restraint, but we simply do not know how accurate these non-invasive blood pressure machines are in cheetahs.

Read More

 

cheetah surgery A Strange Discovery and a New Surgical Procedure!

(Written by Dr Ashleigh Tordiffe for PAKO Magazine – Children’s edition)
During the 2014 & 2015 health examinations on our cheetahs at AfriCat, the vets performed abdominal ultrasonography on all of the cheetahs. This means that they scan each cheetah using an ultrasound scanner, in order to make sure that all of the animal’s internal organs look healthy. When it was 11-year-old Curly’s turn in July 2014, no one was expecting anything to be abnormal. She seemed perfectly healthy – she was eating well, behaving normally, and in very good condition. So you can imagine everyone’s surprise when Doctor Kirberger, the specialist performing the ultrasound scans, pointed out a strange growth on the screen. It was about the size and shape of a tennis ball . . . and it was right in the middle of Curly’s abdomen!

Read More

 

introducing two groups wilddog An attempt of social integration of two unrelated wild dog packs and re-introduction in the Okonjima Nature Reserve

With an estimated 6 000 - 7 000 (Creel & Creel, 2015) individuals left in the wild, the African wild dog (Lycaon pictus) is classified as "Endangered" according to the IUCN Red List of Endangered Species (IUCN, 2015.2). Habitat degradation and fragmentation, relentless anthropogenic persecution, prey depletion as well as the exposure to infectious diseases such as rabies and canine distemper, are contributing to a continuing decreasing population trend. Once distributed throughout most of sub-Saharan Africa, at present, wild dog distribution is restricted to areas with low human population densities in East and southern Africa. Conservation efforts are diverse and include intensive population monitoring programmes, human-wildlife mitigation, habitat restoration and rabies vaccination campaigns for domestic dogs.

Read More

 

adrian team hejThe AfriCat 2015 Annual Health Check

Once a year a team of veterinarians, veterinary nurses, researchers, students and volunteers meet at the AfriCat Foundation to carry out the annual health examinations on all the semi-captive large cats. Some form of annual health check is required by law in Namibia for all captive and semi-captive felids, but at AfriCat we go way beyond what is required, both to ensure that the cats are maintained in excellent health and to maximize the research opportunities. For the past 3 years the team has been led by Dr Adrian Tordiffe [2013 & 2014 from the National Zoological Gardens of South Africa – 2015: from the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Pretoria (UP)], and Dr Gerhard Steenkamp from the Faculty of Veterinary Science at the University of Pretoria (UP).

Read More

 

captive cheetah4Cheetahs in Captivity Need A Better Diet

A lack of high-energy fat in the big cats' diets may cause depression. Which is more stressful: being free, but having to fight for your own food and survival, or being confined in captivity, with all your food and security needs provided for? In cheetahs it seems that unnatural food – rather than captivity itself – is the cause of their known health problems in captivity. Captive cheetahs commonly suffer from chronic inflammation of the stomach lining, various forms of kidney failure, apparent low libido and immune system abnormalities, which are rarely seen in their wild counterparts. Also, members of the cat family are known to groom themselves meticulously, yet captive cheetahs are often covered in burrs and biting flies and hardly seem to notice these discomforts.

Read More

 

electra moving dens2Low Season Sightings Report December 2014 - June 2015

Electra - came out on top this Low Season as the most sighted leopard with 69 sightings. After losing both of her cubs last year she kept going strong and holding her territory in the South Eastern part of the 200km² Okonjima Nature Reserve. She was seen mating on a couple of occasions with Nkosi as well as with newly-collared Madiba in December. During the end of March this year she kept on returning to the same place for several weeks - a hole in a termite mound. Was she having cubs again? On 10 April it was confirmed that Electra had given birth to two cubs when she was sighted moving den sites.

Read More

 

lion on africatWorld Lion Day - 10 August 2015

And the time has come for Namibia’s lions to be regarded as a greater asset alive than dead, not only in its national parks but also in the communal conservancies, which are in essence, our wilderness areas. Namibia boasts approximately 79 registered Communal Conservancies (MET March 2013), of which less than 50% can claim the presence of resident lions; those conservancies adjacent to or in close proximity to protected areas such as Parks and tourism concessions, may be home to lion prides (some 'prides' comprising only two or three lionesses and their cubs, with no resident males), but for the rest, small groups, solitary lions or male coalitions passing through, seem to be the norm.

Read More

 

fig20 big lion teethAfriCat Hobatere Lion Project Update June 2015

The Namibia Large Carnivore Atlas (Ministry of Environment & Tourism, Large Carnivore Atlas 2012) estimates the Namibian population at 1113 – 1644 lions in three density distribution categories: low, medium and high (see distribution Map below). The Kunene and Etosha sub-populations are isolated from the Caprivi/Khaudom sub-population. The Hobatere Concession Area (hereafter referred to as Hobatere) lies adjacent to western Etosha, with the Hobatere lion population falling within the Etosha sub-population and in the medium to high density category according to the distribution maps published by Namibian large carnivore atlas. Lions (Panthera leo) move in and out of Hobatere on a regular basis, along the southern, western and northern boundaries as well as between western Etosha National Park and Hobatere; lions also regularly move through the Etosha boundary fence onto adjacent communal farmland (comprising approximately six communal conservancies) and approximately fifty free-hold livestock / game farms.

Read More

 

male lion a day after collaringAfriCat Lion Research Project Expanded

Last week, three more lions were successfully collared by AfriCat. These lions, two males and a female, were fitted with satellite collars in the Etendeka tourism concession. This is a great step towards expanding AfriCat’s lion research project into the Omatendeka and Anabeb conservancies. On Monday the 25th of May, AfriCat North was contacted by Dennis Liebenberg, manager of the Etendeka Mountain Camp, with the news that at least three lions were very close to the Camp. AfriCat has been planning to expand its lion research to the west and so this was an excellent opportunity to fit some more lions with GPS-Satellite collars. Early on Tuesday the 26th David Roberts, AfriCat’s Vet, set out from AfriCat North’s base will all the necessary darting, measuring and collaring equipment.

Read More

 

prince william tusk AfriCat and Tusk Trust !

"Tusk Trust celebrated its 25 year anniversary last week with a dinner hosted by its patron, The Duke of Cambridge, at Windsor Castle. Donna Hanssen was honoured to attend on behalf of AfriCat, one of only two projects that Tusk support in Namibia. Tusk Trust play a hugely important role at the AfriCat Foundation. Long term supporter and veterinarian, Dr Mark Jago recently wrote, 'Over the years financial assistance has been provided from many quarters, but one of the most loyal and longest-standing partners, has been the Tusk Trust.

Read More

 

ee wallConservation Through Education !

The land, the drama, the splendour – all of it comes together in the northwest of Namibia known today as the Kunene region. It has to be one of the most poignant places remaining on the planet, combining both wide open planes and vast towering mountains on which life at its most real, its most raw, plays out the truth of what is and what has to be. For the most fortunate of us it is possible, on rare occasions, to witness the majesty of one of the most elegant of creatures as she careers at dramatic speeds across this semi-desert , harsh land in pursuit of life. For here, in the most unlikely of places, the cheetah exists right at the very limit of her evolutionary-adapted range.

Read More

 

microbiome research newsCurrent Research on the Cheetah Microbiome

A microbiome is a community of microorganisms that share our body space and play an important part in our physiology and health. Most of these organisms inhabit our gastrointestinal tract, but natural microorganism communities also live on our skin, in our mouths and elsewhere in our bodies. It is estimated that there are 10 times as many microbial organisms (about 100 trillion organisms) on and in the human body than actual human cells. Each of us is therefore a walking ecosystem rather than an individual entity.

Read More

 

01 lion guardiansAfriCat North - Field Notes 2014

Our field-base, AfriCat North, is home to a team of dedicated and driven conservationists, who, together with the Lion Guards of the communal conservancies, spend long, hot days and long, cold nights collaring lions, monitoring their movement in and out of the protected areas of the Hobatere Concession Area and Etosha National Park, at the same time supporting farming communities in human-wildlife conflict zones along these borders.

Read More

 

cheetahs coco bones1The Siblings - Coco, her brother Spud and their leader Bones.

Through the whole of 2013, the 'Siblings' were doing very well. Coco, Bones and Spud were released into 200km² Okonjima Nature Reserve on the 18th of May 2010. Seen on kills every 3–4 days, staying away from danger - although their kills as a coalition include adult zebra, kudu, gnu and oryx! They stick to their territory in the southern part of the Nature Reserve close the Villa and up on the valley, close to Plains Camp, since their last leader, Hammer, was killed in the northern section of the reserve end November 2011, they have never returned to that area again. As always, following this trio, gives our Okonjima guests, scholars from across the country and Team AfriCat wonderful memories while tracking them on foot. They were seen 98 times between January and June (Okonjima’s lower season) this year and 236 times between July and November.

Read More

 

Last Updated on Friday, 22 January 2016 01:13

Hits: 12441

lions1AfriCat Hobatere Lion Research Project (AHLRP) Update 2016
In Africa, lions are mainly restricted to larger parks, reserves, and the remaining wilderness areas in savannas, covering no more than 20–25 % of their historic range (IUCN SSC Cat Specialist Group 2006b; Riggio et al. 2012). Range collapse has been accompanied by plummeting lion numbers. Reliable population estimates for elusive, often nocturnal predators are notoriously difficult, but a variety of estimates converge at roughly 32,000 (Riggio et al. 2012). Rates of decline are alarming, as the number of African lions has fallen 30% over the past two decades (three lion generations) and perhaps by 48.5% since 1980 (IUCN 2012). 

Read More

 

ee programme 2016 ongutaThe AfriCat Foundation Environmental Education Programme 2016
The AfriCat Environmental Education Programme includes, where possible, both AfriCat centers: AfriCat Head Quarters on Okonjima farm, Otjozondjupa Region (central Namibia) and AfriCat North, the field base along Etosha’s south-western boundary, Kunene Region (northwest Namibia). 2016 has been a year of even greater challenges for the AfriCat Foundation in its drive to conserve and protect Namibia’s carnivores, simultaneously encouraging and supporting farming communities living with carnivores: into the fourth year of a crippling drought, farmers have lost large numbers of their livestock and those still alive are emaciated, with little chance of survival; the carnivores, preying on the weak and slow, intensify the Human-Wildlife Conflict in most areas.

Read More

 

vets mariaAfriCat's Annual Health Check - 2016

From the 26th of June to the 7th of July 2016, the AfriCat team immobilized 27 cheetahs, 1 leopard and 1 lion at the AfriCat Foundation for their annual health examinations and to collect samples for our registered, research project (The long-term health monitoring and immuno-competence of captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus) and other felids at AfriCat in Namibia – Permit no. 2184/2016). Three leopards and 2 male lions were not immobilized, but visually inspected for any abnormalities.  All the animals were weighed. Blood and urine samples were collected and haematology and serum biochemistry profiles performed for each animal.  

Read More

 

ultrasonographic adrenal gland researchUltrasonographic adrenal gland findings in healthy semi-captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus)

Cheetahs are known to be particularly vulnerable to a number of clinical conditions when in captivity. Some of these conditions, such as gastritis and gastric ulcers, have been linked to increased stress levels in other species. In order to determine how much of a role stress plays in these conditions in cheetahs, scientists need to be able to measure stress in some way. Until now this has mainly been achieved by looking at levels of glucocorticoids ("stress hormones") – mainly cortisol – in the animals’ faeces. This method has its drawbacks, though. Not only are there practical difficulties when it comes to sampling – especially in free-ranging animals, or animals kept in groups - but it also gives a narrow picture, as it reflects only corticoid values within the 12-24 hours prior to the sample being produced.

Read More

 

blood lions posterWorld Lion Day 2016

The Harsh Reality . . .  "One year ago, with the loss of Cecil, . . . . people and initiatives fighting to save the lion"- Dr Luke Hunter, President, Panthera. With the most recent and detailed report on the status of the African lion published by Panthera, 'Beyond Cecil: Africa’s Lions in Crisis', those of us who truly care are numbed by the shocking statistics and atrocities that have come to light: - Lion populations have plummeted by 43% in the past 20 years, to an estimated 20 000; in the same time-frame, populations in West, Central and East have collectively dropped by 60%; - Lions have lost 75% of their original habitat in the past 100 years, lions now only occupy 8% of their historical range (which once spanned an area of over 13 million km2), and according to reports have disappeared entirely from 12 African countries, with possible recent extinction in four more;

Read More

 

vet students wilddogUNAM Vet Students Go Wild - Students were given a glimpse of the daily life of a wildlife vet!

The establishment of a School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Namibia was approved by the UNAM Senate in September 2015. Currently, the pioneer class is in their third year of study, having started in 2013 in a small Veterinary Department. The School offers two courses: a Bachelor of Veterinary Medicine degree course, and a Diploma course in Animal Health. The purpose of these programs is to provide Namibia with veterinary science graduates who are theoretically and practically competent to meet the veterinary requirements of the country. After being armed with the basic foundation veterinary courses in the first three years including veterinary anatomy, physiology, animal welfare, virology and bacteriology, as well as public health and epidemiology, students will then advance to veterinary clinical studies, where they will be taught the art and science of medicine, surgery, anaesthesia, diagnostic imaging and the like.

Read More

 

leopard laparoscopy2Laparoscopic salpingectomy in two captive leopards using a single portal access system

(A new surgical technique for sterilizing leopards is described for the first time). Ongoing collaboration with scientists and the conservation authorities and working closely with the farming community allows for studies to be conducted that provide valuable information on large carnivores and their long-term conservation in Namibia. AfriCat has been involved in a number of studies involving the carnivore 'ambassadors' at AfriCat, captive and free-roaming. The annual health examinations of the cats at AfriCat give invited specialist veterinarians the opportunity to conduct research of various aspects of animal health, particularly those relating to the health of large carnivores in captivity. 

Read More

 

wild dog pups AfriCat rescues 9 'Deserted' Wild Dog Pups!

It was Sunday, the 26th of June – the evening before AfriCat’s annual health check was about to start . . . Team AfriCat and the participating vets were in preparation for an early start the following day, when we received a phone call after sunset from the Chairperson of Okamatapati Conservancy (a communal conservancy approx. 160 km east of Okonjima) - a communal farmer was in possession of nine orphaned Wild Dog pups. Wild Dog usually dig their dens and give birth during the dry months June, July and August. The denning period of approximately three months, is the only time of the year when Wild Dogs return to the same location every day, limiting their mobility which can result in a decreased encounter rate with prey species.

Read More

 

cheetah falling asleep after darting4Hyperthermia in Cheetahs

Although not many people are aware of the fact, one of the most frequent causes of deaths in cheetahs during immobilisation is hyperthermia (overheating). This phenomenon has not been studied or described much at all, but the annual health checks at AfriCat have provided Dr. Adrian Tordiffe and colleagues a unique opportunity to study and learn more about this problem - to try and understand what causes it, and to begin to develop ways of managing and preventing it. In cheetahs who develop hyperthermia, temperatures measured shortly after darting can be over 40℃ and are sometimes still rising. If the body temperature is not brought down rapidly this can have severe consequences for the cheetah - brain damage, damage to the digestive tract and/or cardiorespiratory failure.

Read More

 

cheetah ultrasound4Ultrasonographic and laparoscopic evaluation of the reproductive tract in older captive female cheetahs (Acinonoyx jubatus)

(Assessing the value of transabdominal ultrasound in monitoring the reproductive status of cheetahs).
In order to manage the reproduction of a population of animals, it is very useful to be able to determine where the females are in terms of their breeding cycle. When it comes to cheetahs, there are a number of non-invasive, field-friendly ways of doing this, including measuring hormone levels, looking at cells taken from the reproductive tract, and ultrasound. Unlike the other two methods, transabdominal diagnostic ultrasound (where the animal is scanned through the abdominal wall) has the advantage in that there is no need to wait for results from a laboratory after sampling. 

Read More

 

portal accessEffect of portal access system and surgery type on surgery times during laparoscopic ovariectomy and salpingectomy in captive African lions and cheetahs

(Comparing surgical techniques in order to make sterilization surgery safer for wild lions and cheetahs).
There are a number of reasons why the management of population numbers of large cats such as lions and cheetahs is becoming more important. There are stricter controls on hunting, and increasing numbers of free-ranging lions in smaller parks. Predator overpopulation leads to increasing threat to antelope (prey species) populations in these areas, and so, in order to maintain balance in these environments, predator numbers need to be managed. One of the ways in which this can be done is by the surgical sterilization of breeding animals.

Read More

 

phase5 pp31 32The AfriCat Okonjima Predator Population Density Study: Phase 5

Preliminary results PHASE 5: Eland Dam - North Dam 23 March - 11 May 2016 
The fifth block of the study area was monitored from the 23rd March 2016 until 11th May 2016. The block is located in the north-western part of the reserve and is covering an area of 44.7 km2. The area is hosting three water reservoirs which are artificially supplied with water during the dry season (April - October) and thus, perennially accessible. The area is mainly characterized by a thorny bush- and scrub savanna interspersed with newly opened patches of open grass savanna. Elevation ranges between 1580 and 1640 meters above sea level. Most common prey occurring in the area includes oryx (Oryx gazella), plain zebra (Equus quagga), common eland (Tragelaphus eland) and common warthog (Phacochaerus africanus). 20 cameras were distributed throughout the area. Inter-trap distances ranged from 1.3 to 2.3 kilometers (1.60 ± 0.23) to increase the likelihood that no individual could move through the study area without being detected.

Read More

 

lion schoolsMamma AfriCat and Lion Schools

An Amazing week with AfriCat, including three days in the communities of Northern Namibia with one of Africa’s most inspiring conservationists, Tammy Hoth followed by a further four days at Okonjima with Donna Hanssen and her wonderful team, to attend the Annual General Meeting of the Charity and to witness a perfect example of conservation, education and research working together. Human wildlife conflict is a perpetual battle but by AfriCat providing funding for formal education, research, Lion Guards, and other structural support the buy in of local communities can be and is being achieved and it’s a battle that can have a successful outcome for all.

Read More

 

motorbike update2016 hda sept15The AfriCat Motorbikes, Harley, Aprilia, Ducati and their mate Starsky!

The beginnings . . . .  Harley, and his two sisters, Ducati and Aprilia - aka 'The Motorbikes' - arrived at AfriCat at the age of five months back in 2009. Their mother was shot, and after the farmer caught the orphaned cubs he kept them in a chicken cage for four weeks. Yet again another sad story of the condition of cats when they arrived at AfriCat . . . They all showed signs of calcium deficiency, skew legs and limps, however, after getting introduced to the right food enriched with vitamins and mineral supplements, their condition improved visibly. Starsky came to AfriCat together with his brother, Hutch, as three-month old cubs; sharing the same history as The Motorbikes - their mother had also been shot.

Read More

 

2016 wild dog storyThe AfriCat Wild Dogs - Messi, Jogi and Robin

A successful integration. After the successful integration of our 10-year old wild female dog, Ricky, into the pack FIFA, which consists of the three orphaned pups Jogi, Messi and Robin, the newly established pack are finally roaming every corner of the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve! With Ricky being an experienced and skillful hunter, Team FIFA quickly learned and adapted to the rules of the wild, and started hunting regularly after only four weeks following their release in July 2015. The rehabilitation of wild dogs often fails due to lack of hunting abilities and survival skills. However, research has shown that animals raised in captivity obtain hunting skills more rapidly when they are released with those which have also been caught in the wild, compared to a rehabilitated group which solely consists of animals reared in captivity.

Read More

 

p4 madibaThe AfriCat Okonjima Predator Population Density Study Phase 4

Preliminary results PHASE 4: Dam Lise - Buffalo Dam 26 January - 15 March 2016
The fourth block of the study area was monitored from the 26th January 2016 until 15th March 2016. The block is located in the north-eastern part of the reserve (Fig. 1) and is covering an area of 34.9 km2. The area is hosting four water reservoirs which are all artificially supplied with water during the dry season (April - October) and thus, perennially accessible. The area is mainly characterized by a thorny bush- and scrub savanna interspersed with patches of open grass savanna and a dry river system in the central part of the area. Elevation ranges between 1580 and 1640 meters above sea level. Most common prey occurring in the area includes oryx (Oryx gazella), common eland (Tragelaphus eland), greater kudu (Tragelaphus strepsiceros) and common warthog (Phacochaerus africanus).

Read More

 

africat north onguta tented schoolA Word From The AfriCat UK Chairman, David Farquharson

"Last week, as part of my role as Chairman of the UK charity AfriCat, I had the privilege of spending three days in the communities of Northern Namibia with one of Africa’s most inspiring conservationists, Tammy Hoth-Hanssen. In her role as director of the AfriCat Foundation, Tammy and her small team of Lion Guards work tirelessly to address the multitude of issues arising out of human-wildlife conflict. Tammy’s team work particularly in the area west and north west of Etosha where the protected Hobatere Concession meets communal farmlands head on. With a drought that stretches back four years and very little support for the maintenance of fences, lions and livestock are on a dangerous collision course. "

Read More

 

nawdp2 2014Namibian African Wild Dog Project Update

Annual Report 2015, Prepared by Stuart Munro and Dr. Rudie van Vuuren
2015 saw the Namibia African Wild Dog Project (NAWDP) experience both positives and negatives with respect to the monitoring of the wild dog populations on the Kavango Cattle Ranch (KCR) and the Mangetti National Park (MNP) in northern Namibia. Visits to the sites for the monitoring of motion-sensitive trail cameras were limited to 5 separate occasions due to time and personnel constraints. An aerial game census was carried out in August, the results of which recorded diminished game numbers from preceding counts. There were no recorded wild dog mortalities or disturbance of dens on the KCR during 2015 however several dogs denning in the MNP were shot on adjacent livestock farmland.

Read More

 

tourism supports conservationOkonjima - Where Tourism Supports Conservation

Published by Travel News Namibia April 4, 2016
Text and photographs Annabelle Venter
Read this story on the Travel News Namibia Website.
Shortly after my arrival at Plains Camp on a hot midsummer’s noon I’m drifting in a cool, round pool with corrugated iron sides. A Stewarts & Lloyds windmill clinks hypnotically overhead, slowly grinding to a halt as the breeze subsides. One could be forgiven for thinking one is on an African farm, but of course that’s exactly what the Hanssen family wants you to experience.
Okonjima is very much a family affair and originally started out as a Brahman cattle farm, before evolving into the conservation success story of today, with an array of luxury accommodation to ensure you enjoy your stay.

Read More

 

leopard density study phase3 1The AfriCat Okonjima Predator Population Density Study Phase 3

Preliminary results PHASE 3: Serenjima 10 November - 29 December 2015 The third block of the study area was monitored from the 10th November 2015 until 29th December 2015. The block is located in the central-western part of the reserve (Fig. 1) and is covering an area of 34.8 km2. The area is hosting six water reservoirs of which two are artificially supplied with water and thus, perennially accessible. The area is characterized by an open grass savanna which is bordering block one in the south and a thorny bush - and scrub savanna covering the majority of the region. Elevation ranges between 1584 and 1630 meters above sea level. Due to a seasonal climate with the rainy season between October and March, the area received approximately 80 mm of precipitation during the sampling period.

Read More

 

morticiaAfriCat Says Goodbye to Morticia

PAYING TRIBUTE TO A VERY BRAVE CHEETAH! AfriCat says good-bye to one of the Adams family – 14 year old Morticia! Morticia was one of our cheetah ambassadors at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre. Morticia and her three siblings, Pugsley, Gomez and Wednesday are the four, well-known cheetahs @ AfriCat, also known as ‘The Addams Family’ They were removed from their mother’s womb after she had been shot.

Read More

 

karib lions farmerThe 'Karibib' Lions - A Report by Team AfriCat

On Tuesday, 9 February 2016, AfriCat got a call from a concerned farmer in the Karibib area (western Namibia, bordering the edge of the Namibia desert. The ‘Namib’ is a coastal desert in southern Africa. The name Namib is of Nama origin and means “vast place” ) . His farm is about 20 kilometers southwest of Karibib. He reported lion activity in the area and that fresh tracks were found that morning in a riverbed; possibly 3 animals but no size, age nor sex could be ascertained. One of the neighbouring farmers also informed him that the same morning one of their horses had been attacked – possibly by a lion? On Wednesday we got another call from the manager of a local guestfarm, bordering the farm in question, where lion tracks had also been found and lions were heard roaring in that area the previous night.

Read More

 

africat north lion trackingOur Favourite Places on Earth . . . AfriCat North in Namibia - Part 2

The next morning after breakfast we left for Hobatere Lodge to visit Tammy Hoth-Hanssen and the AfriCat North project. We drove through Otjiwarongo, Outjo and Kamanjab 350 kms. We planned to stay two nights. The drive into Hobatere Lodge (leaving the tarred road) was 16 km on gravel / rock / sand and hills. It was about as much as we wanted to tackle with our rental car. The scenery driving into Hobatere Nature Conservancy was stunning. Moping trees, parkland – treed grassy hills, many small mountains (maybe 350 metres high) and sandy rivers. The conservancy had had 70 mm of rain a few days before our arrival so it was green. Wildlife had moved away from the main water hole because it wasn’t the only source of water.

Read More

 

warthog waterholeOur Favourite Places on Earth . . . Okonjima Lodge in Namibia - Part 1

Visit the Okonjima Blog for a brand new post by Paul and Shirley Martens - Old family friends to the Okonjima Family, Avid Photographers and Wildlife enthusiasts. Okonjima and the AfriCat Foundation are run by the Hanssen Family siblings, Wayne, Tammy, Donna and Rosalea and some extended family and friends. We’re staying at Bush Camp right now and I am sitting in the day room part of our accommodation. The birds are singing. I can see springbok and a herd of oryx within a few hundred metres. Every once in a while two oryx are head to head (horns entangled) in what appears to be a dominance ritual, the dust flies and a chase ensues.

Read More

 

leopard study 2 newsThe AfriCat Okonjima Predator Population Density Study Phase 2

Preliminary results PHASE 2: Poort - Super Highway 16 Sep - 4 Nov 2015 The second block within the entire study area (20 000 ha) was monitored from the 16th September 2015 - 4th November 2015 and measures 3 242 hectares (32.42 km2) in size (Fig. 1). The block is situated in the south-east, east of the reserve and includes the main road (5.19 km) used to enter and leave the reserve.

The area consists of six water sources of which five are permanently installed and perennially accessible. The vegetation mainly consists of thorny bush - and scrub savannah in the northern part of the area and a mountainous area in the southern part with an altitudinal range from 1550 to 1860 meters above sea level.

Read More

 

dizzy updateDizzy Update - her 2015 year

RELEASE OUT OF ALCATRAZ. After Dizzy gave birth to her second litter in July 2015 and after the loss of cub number one only two days after birth, we decided to relocate Dizzy and her remaining three cubs into Alcatraz - a soft release camp located within the 20 000 ha Okonjima Nature Reserve. Even though cub mortality in cheetahs is not uncommon and it is arguable how much one should interfere with nature, we felt that it is our responsibility to give these cheetahs the best possible chances of survival.

Read More

 

leopard capture on cameraThe AfriCat Okonjima Predator Population Density Study Phase 1

Preliminary results PHASE 1 Combretum - Okonjima Dam 27 Jul - 11 Sep 2015. The first block within the study area was monitored from the 24th July 2015 - 11th September 2015 and measured 3 816 hectares in size (Fig. 1). The block is situated in the south-west of the reserve and is characterized by a high number of accessible prey. The area consists of seven natural water points of which five are permanently installed and perennially accessible. The vegetation is mainly classified as thorny bush - and scrub savannah interspersed by a prominent mountain ridge in the north-western part of the area. 20 cameras were distributed throughout the area (Fig.2). Inter-trap distances ranged from 1.1 to 2.2 kilometers (1.59 ± 0.27) to increase the likelihood that no individual could move through the study area without being detected.

Read More

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 24 December 2016 04:57

Hits: 10637

shanti jumpingGuide Sightings Report Peak Season June - November 2014

SHANTI was the most popular leopard among guides and guests, with 160 sightings between June and November 2014, following in the footsteps of her famous mother MJ. Shanti is MJ’s only cub from her fourth litter and was born in March 2013 in the Okonjima Nature Reserve. A year later, mother and daughter were seen apart more and more frequently. As a result, Shanti was collared in April 2014. Back then, at only 13 months old, Shanti had reached a weight of 32 kg, which equalled the weight of her 14 year old mother. Ever since then, Shanti (which means quiet, peace and tranquility in Sanskrit and is described as an 'unusual woman with a distinct personality') has roamed the ranges of the Okonjima Nature Reserve by herself and has become the favourite of the Okonjima guides.

Read More

 

cheetah penta 2014Penta, Pins and Needle

Since her release into the Okonjima, 20 000 ha Nature Reserve more than a year ago on 4 June 2013, Penta has had it tough. She struggled to find water and food and to avoid predators, which were responsible for the loss of two of her five cubs in the first three weeks after their release. One was taken by a leopard and the other one unknown. This made us realize just how difficult it is for a cheetah to be relocated into a new area. It took her a good six months to settle in to her new environment with her remaining three cubs, two females and one male. In December 2013 she started making regular kills to feed all four of them and became very popular with our Okonjima guests going out on cheetah tracking.

Read More

 

dizzy 2nd litter5 july2014Dizzy - A story about a rehabilitated cheetah mother!

Dizzy – a successfully rehabilitated AfriCat cheetah and first time mother in the Okonjima Nature Reserve, has raised her female cub Spirit to adulthood. And now she’s done it again! In July 2014 Dizzy gave birth to her second litter – this time consisting of four little ones. Dizzy, whose territory has mainly been the north-western part of the 200 km² Okonjima Nature Reserve, was seen in the south in mid-January 2013, mating with one of our male cheetahs, Bones. She returned, but on 10 April she was spotted in the south again and, lo and behold, six days later on 16 April 2013 she gave birth to three cubs. Our very first cheetah cubs in the Okonjima Nature Reserve!

Read More

 

messiThe Wild Dogs - Part 2: Team FIFA and The Wild Dog Management Plan 2014 / 2015

Our three 'painted dog' pups - Jogi, Messi and Robin from the Okakarara region, (approx 100km from AfriCat HQ), arrived at AfriCat on the evening of 14th of July 2014. We estimated their age between 5 to 6 weeks old. They were found abandoned and in poor condition, together with 6 other puppies that unfortunately were found dead by the time Jogi Messi and Robin were rescued. These 3 orphaned African Wild Dog puppies were handed over to the M.E.T (Ministry of Environment and Tourism), by the local community, who had found them after their pack had apparently been poisoned and shot.

Read More

 

wilddogs namibia3The Wild Dogs - Part 1: Rex, Ruby, Ricky and Raine

In May 2005 seven 3-week-old wild dog puppies arrived at AfriCat. Rearing five of them to adulthood was a certainly a journey full of trials and tribulations - Sadly we lost two puppies quite early on, but RAINE, RICKY, RUBY, REX and RUFUS kept us on our toes. One thing that did astound us was the amazing bond the puppies had between them. Even though they were so tiny and there were no adult dogs in their small pack, they only needed us to supply the food . . . . and once that had disappeared (in a matter of milliseconds) they were quite happy with the company and companionship of each other for play and comfort.

Read More

 

david with chris packham AfriCat Travels to the United Kingdom to raise funds for conservation

It was wonderful that Tammy was able to visit the UK in October 2014 and AfriCat UK arranged a varied programme of activities talks, meetings and events, keeping her very busy! The Conservation Through Education theme was brought to the UK as Tammy met with and talked to pupils from four different schools. At another event,  AfriCat supporters, old friends and new, met at the RGS in London to listen to Chris Packham, talk about his wildlife encounters and photography. Chris is a passionate wildlife expert, professional photographer, TV presenter and most importantly for us, AfriCat’s patron.

Read More

 

hampton school africat northHampton School Adventure Society Expedition visits AfriCat in Namibia

After leaving Etosha, we travelled down to Okonjima, a 55,000 acre reserve for Namibia’s large carnivores. After arriving at the campsite we were given a quick talk on dos and don’ts before we went out to spend the evening tracking cheetahs. We travelled in a couple of land cruisers to see if we could catch a glimpse of the newly reintroduced cheetah siblings Coco, Spud and Bones from the vehicles. We worked out, using a radio tracking device, that the cheetahs were in the middle of some thick bush which we couldn’t drive into and so to continue tracking them, we got out on foot. We were told that a leopard was in the area and so should follow our guides in single file with another guide bringing up the rear. We soon found the cheetahs and were able to get some stunning photographs as the siblings half slept in the evening sun.

Read More

 

steenkamp kids cheetah dentist1Veterinary Dentistry is still a very young speciality

Animal welfare includes not only a lack of inflicted pain and stress, but also an adequate level of wellbeing, which includes good mental and physical health. Most would agree that animals have feelings like fear, frustration, boredom and aggression. It has been proposed that 'animal welfare' is rooted in feelings and that these have evolved to protect the animal's primary needs.

Thus, if an animal feels well, it is faring well. A feelings-based approach to welfare research typically measures behavioural outcomes and behavioural signs of fear or frustration. Such research has led to the conclusion that animals have fundamental behavioural needs that they must be allowed to satisfy.

Read More

 

female and male during mating4The AfriCat Predator Population Density Study in the Okonjima Nature Reserve

In the last decades human activities have led to the devastating destruction of large parts of natural habitats (Gaston, 2008) leading to the dramatic decrease and threatened status of many wildlife species worldwide. The leopard (Panthera pardus) is classified as "Near Threatened" according to the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species (IUCN, 2014.2.). Leopards occur across wide ranges of sub-Saharan Africa as well as inhabit parts of Northern Africa and tropical Asia (Friedmann & Holzer, 2008). Their adaptability and tolerance towards a wide range of various habitats as well as their secretive and elusive nature had let them survive in marginal areas from which other felid have disappeared completely (IUCN, 2014.2).

Read More

 

baby cheetah AfriCat turns 21!

The Album: From Rescue & Release TO . . .  Rehabilitation, Research, Conservation Through Education & Community Support!  'You've got the Key' . . . .  is the well-known adage when someone comes of 'age', when parents nostalgically page through photo albums, reminiscing childhood memories and the 21-year old can't wait to take on LIFE . . . . armed only with family values and the will to succeed out there in the big world! For the past 21 years, AfriCat has been a toddler and a teen - stumbled, fallen and righted its self knowing that its parents, the HANSSEN family, were there to guide it to adulthood and beyond.

Read More

 

adopt a spot'Likes' don't save lives

Everything these days is about social media. It is indisputable that Facebook helps non-profit organizations reach out with their message, educate members about a specific cause and promote their work. Therefore, enormous amount of time and effort is spent, even by organizations with limited staff and budget, on social media as a marketing tool. The question is, how effective it? When it comes to actually helping the cause, what sort of impact does 'likes' on Facebook have?

Not much, according to UNICEF, who in a recent YouTube commercial send a clear message:
 "Likes don't save lives. Money does."

Read More

 

 

gerhard gastro biopsiesThe 2014 Annual AfriCat Health Checks!

This year a team of specialists, mostly from UP, joined the normal AfriCat team to surgically sterilize the female cheetahs and leopards that are considered unsuitable for release into the wild. The Namibian government passed legislation requiring the irreversible sterilization of all female captive large felids in a bid to prevent the captive breeding and illegal trade of these species. Dr Marthinus Hartman, one of the surgeons at UP, had developed a minimally-invasive laparoscopic technique to sterilize captive lions in South Africa. With the specialized equipment provided by the German company – Karl Storz, the cheetahs and leopards could have their ovaries removed or fallopian tubes tied off in the same way, through a single tiny surgical incision. This would mean less trauma and pain and a far lower risk of any post-operative complications.

Read More

 

06 mamma hobs campsiteAfriCat Hobatere Lion Research Project Update July 2014

The Namibia Large Carnivore Atlas (Ministry of Environment & Tourism, Large Carnivore Atlas 2012) estimates the Namibian population at 1113 – 1644 lions in three density distribution categories: low, medium and high. The Kunene and Etosha sub-populations are isolated from the Caprivi/Khaudom sub-population. The Hobatere Concession Area (hereafter referred to as Hobatere) lies adjacent to western Etosha, with the Hobatere lion population falling within the Etosha sub-population and in the medium to high density category.

Read More

needle and pinsGuide Sightings Report Low Season January - June 2014

ELECTRA was the most popular leopard during our 'low' season this year which stretches from January until June. With a total of 124 sightings she was regularly spotted on the eastern side of the Okonjima Nature Reserve. She was seen on 21 kills, mainly - orxy, warthog and juvenile kudus. Electra gave birth to 2 cubs in August 2013. Unfortunately, the first-time-mother lost both cubs.

Read More

male female lionIn honour of World Lion Day 10 August 2014

An Overview of the AFRICAT Communal Carnivore Conservation Programme (CCCP)
Last year, we posed the question: "Does the Namibian lion stand a chance?" This year, I’d like to share with you the AfriCat programmes committed to ensuring that free-ranging lions survive alongside future generations of conservation-minded Namibians. Since its inception in the early 90’s, AfriCat’s mission has been to find workable solutions to the ever-present farmer-predator conflict on both free-hold and communal farmland. AfriCat North, our field-base situated along the south-western Etosha National Park boundary, is especially familiar with high livestock losses to lions leaving the confines of the Park and the unabated, retaliatory persecution of these and other carnivores.

Read More

 

world lion day 370pxWorld Lion Day - 10 August 2014

Can you imagine Namibia without Lions, if we had lost all of our lions to persecution, illegal trade and unsustainable off-take?
Some farmers might say good riddance, others may be indifferent, but I am convinced that the majority of Namibians would regret not having done more to ensure the lions’ long-term survival.
World Lion Day, to be celebrated globally on 10 August, is the perfect opportunity for the world to take note of the plight of the African Lion, for us all to take the time to ponder the reality of today’s pressures on wildlife and the wilderness sustaining these wondrous animals who have, to date, stood the test of time – but for how long will they be able to run from Man?

Read More

 

electra and baby leopard cubElectra - A first time mother

In August last year Electra, a female leopard, was found on more kills than usual. Even with a full belly she would still hunt. Was she perhaps feeding cubs?  Electra was collared in the 20 000ha Okonjima Nature Reserve on 7 May 2010, for tracking and research purposes. In the beginning she was skittish, shy of people and cars, and the guides hardly ever got a chance to see her. It was only in January 2013, since found mating with TJ and Nkosi, that Electra started to relax at bit. It could have been because both these males were so comfortable around vehicles.

Read More

 

german ambassador visitSupport from Germany for the Namibia Wild Dog Project!

The German Development Cooperation and the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation, Sponsor the Namibia Wild Dog Project! The German Ambassador, Mr Huekmann of BMZ (The German Development Cooperation & The German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation & Development), handed over the donation of 10 motion detection cameras for the Namibia Wild Dog Project at AfriCat HQ in the Okonjima Nature Reserve.

Read More

 

ee weekendAfriCat Foundation Environmental Education Programme 2014

We have discovered that for many Namibian children and adults, the AfriCat Environmental Education Programme is their first camping and outdoor educational experience. Few have had the opportunity to visit wildlife reserves, observe antelope and wild large carnivores, and to experience the natural wonder of their own country. Neither have they been introduced to the vocational opportunities which tourism visitation, hand-in-glove with conservation, offers. AfriCat has advocated environmental education since 1998.

Read More

 

lion guardians captionAfriCat welcomes 4 new team members - Selma and David, Jackson and Kandavii!

After 2 years as Administrator at AfriCat, it sadly was time for Chris Moshosho to move on to new challenges in Windhoek, where he will also get the chance to be closer to his family. Chris was immensely popular at AfriCat, and an invaluable member of the team. He is already missed, and on his request we send regular updates on the cats at Okonjima & AfriCat. In January 2014, we welcomed Selma Amadhila to Team AfriCat.

Read More

 

electra cub peakseason 2013Guide Sightings Report Peak Season August - November 2013

OKONJIMA & AFRICAT had a very successful peak season and our guests had wonderful sightings of cheetah, wild dogs, hyaenas and of course of the 2 popular, leopard mothers with their cubs as well as rehabilitated Dizzy and her cub and rescued Penta and her 3 cubs. Leopards were still our most popular trail, but tracking rehabilitated carnivores that once lived a 'life in captivity', but are now hunting independently – always touches the hearts of any animal lover.
A total of 596 leopard sightings were recorded and the other carnivores added up to; cheetahs 461 sightings, wild dogs 18 sightings and hyaenas 16 sightings.

Read More

 

21 spots pride mountainThe Hobatere Lion Research Project: reporting October 2013 - February 2014

The Hobatere Lion Research Project, which runs through the Communal Carnivore Conservation Programme (CCCP), aims to re-establish accurate current data on the demography of lions within The Hobatere Concession Area, which forms a corridor between the northwest and the Etosha National Park and surrounding areas. It will provide data on the movement of lions into and out of Hobatere and aims to quantify both the degree of human-lion conflict and the impact it has on people living around Hobatere. Driven by an increased food supply, the spatial expansion of lion in the conservancies of the north-western Kunene Region has increased. While numbers of certain large carnivores have remained stable or increased, numbers of lions have steadily declined. The disproportionate control of lion may be due to less tolerance of lion, driven by fear rather than actual negative impacts.

Read More

 

baby warthog hickupThe story of a Warthog . . . . A hog shaped hole in my heart.

Little did I know when our plane touched down on Namibian soil that I'd be returning to the UK, two weeks later, having fallen madly in love with . . . . a warthog!

I first met 'Hick-Up' at the AfriCat office. There he was; just a few weeks old. Resembling a remote-controlled toy he zoomed over every available area of floor space on high-heeled trotters with his aerial-like tail held stiff in the air. With his head, accounting for almost 50% of his body, he was instantly adorable.

Read More

 

Last Updated on Sunday, 05 March 2017 07:41

Hits: 13545

Subcategories

Copyright AfriCat All rights reserved Copying of images is prohibited

Top Desktop version