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'Likes' Don't Save Lives

vip donors honoured by africathuman wildlife conflict

Everything these days is about social media. It is indisputable that Facebook helps non-profit organizations reach out with their message, educate members about a specific cause and promote their work. Therefore, enormous amount of time and effort is spent, even by organizations with limited staff and budget, on social media as a marketing tool. The question is, how effective it? When it comes to actually helping the cause, what sort of impact does 'likes' on Facebook have?

Not much, according to UNICEF, who in a recent YouTube commercial send a clear message:
 "Likes don't save lives. Money does."

With this video UNICEF are trying to clarify the need for real action, not just supporting a good cause by hitting the 'like' button. At the end of the day, donations are what all organizations need to continue their work. 'Liking' a charitable cause publicly allows people to feel they've done their part without committing any actual money or time to it.

 

AfriCat facebook pages:

Our Group page: www.facebook.com/groups/137505922926143/

Our Charity page: www.facebook.com/TheAfriCatFoundation

Our Environmental Education page: www.facebook.com/pages/AfriCat-Environmental-Education/270729123046968

 

A crucial part of our work at The AfriCat Foundation is raising the necessary funds for our cause. We are constantly picking our brains, evaluating, and developing new strategies to communicate our needs to the public. Not only do we need to cover our daily, running costs to achieve our mission – the long-term conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores – we also run a number of important projects in need of continuous funding. See: AfriCat Projects. 

human wildlife conflict
Human Wildlife Conflict.
cte students cheetahs
CTE students learning about cheetahs.
vet procedures
Veterinary procedures.
cte students learning about lions
CTE students learning about lions.
human wildlife conflict
Human Wildlife Conflict.
monitoring rehabilitated captive cheetahs
Monitoring rehabiliated cheetahs.

For example:

The AfriCat Hobatere Lion Research Project http://www.africat.org/projects/africat-hobatere-lion-research-project and http://www.africat.org/projects/africat-hobatere-lion-research-project/ahlrp-update-july-2014 , where we are Conducting a study of the Lion (Panthera leo) population within the Hobatere Concession Area and movements between the Hobatere Concession Area, western Etosha National Park and adjacent communal farmland;

The Namibia African Wild Dog Project http://www.africat.org/projects/mangetti-wild-dog , gathering information about the endangered wild dogs that roam in the  Mangetti Cattle Ranch (Lat/Lon: 18° 44' 9.96" (S) and 18° 34' 53.94" (E)), a government 'parastatal' farm conglomerate in the Kavango Region, administered by the Namibia Development Corporation (NDC) who have granted access to the property for African wild dog research purposes. Mangetti Cattle Ranch is approximately 168,900ha in size and is comprised of over 40 individual farms predominantly for livestock production. The ranch also constitutes part of the western boundary of wild dog range in the country. With government permission it is hoped to include the Mangetti NP into the study area in order to give a comparative analysis of African wild dog ecology;

and our Environmental Education Programme http://www.africat.org/projects/the-africat-environmental-education-programme , reaching out to Namibians school kids from all over the country, teaching them about conservation and wildlife;

Then there is the AfriCat project where we are rehabilitating captive cheetahs and documenting the success rate of rehabilitation. AfriCat is trying to determine how rehabilitation will influence predator-prey ratios and update the model accordingly. We are also researching the success of 'captive cheetah rehabilitation' within an island-bound conservation area;

For a number of years, specialist veterinarians have been invited to share their expertise or to contribute to valuable research during our AfriCat annual health-checks. Veterinary specialists in the fields of dentistry, ophthalmology, gastro-enterology, and reproduction are consulted to give input to the health assessments and perform various procedures which may be required to determine the long-term health monitoring and immune-competence of captive cheetahs and other felids at AfriCat and in the Okonjima Nature Reserve;

The AfriCat Predator and Prey Population Density Study in the Okonjima Nature Reserve is another project AfriCat is undertaking by trying to understand how private, tourism-based game parks in Namibia can play a role in the long-term conservation of carnivores. AfriCat, is developing a model for the variety of prey animals that can be supported by this environment. 


 

So, how do we communicate our dire need for funding more clearly? How do we get our supporters and ambassadors worldwide to continue to make donations? Do we carry on the rewarding, but time consuming daily posts with pictures on Facebook? If so, how do we motivate our enthusiastic Facebook members to make donations and spread our message? We are asking you, our long time supporters, new members, partners and enthusiasts – what is the best way forward to guarantee the future of The AfriCat Foundation?

 

UNICEF continues their anti-like campaign with this statement: "Like us on Facebook, and we will vaccinate zero children against polio"

We have NOTHING against likes, but taking care of the rescued carnivores at our Carnivore Care Centre and monitoring the rehabilitated cats in the 20 000ha\200km² Okonjima Nature Reserve costs money and WE NEED YOUR HELP!

Here is a list of how you can really make a difference for AfriCat:


N$50 food for 1 day for a cheetah, leopard or lion
N$250 food for 1 week for a cheetah, leopard or lion
N$250 weekend stay for 1 student at our Environmental Education Programme

N$3,000  VHF-radio collar for a cheetah or a leopard for tracking and research purposes
N$10,000 covers 1 serious veterinary procedure
N$10,000 2 trail cameras (white flash) for the Namibian African Wild Dog Project
N$25,000 GPS-Satellite collar for 1 lion for the AfriCat Hobatere Lion Research Project
N$40,000 building of 1 stock-kraal to protect cattle and goats for 1 village for our Live Stock Protection Programme.

 

mesh wire donation kraal
Mesh wire donation for kraal upgrade.
motion detection cameras
Motion detection cameras.
collar for lion
GPS-Satellite collars for Lions.
monitoring rehabilitated captive cheetahs
Food for a cheetah.
monitoring rehabilitated captive cheetahs
Fuel to monitor rehabilitated cheetahs.

motion detection cameras leopards
Motion detection cameras.

More information about how YOU can support AfriCat: http://www.africat.org/support

 

HOW CAN YOU HELP AFRICAT ?

1. MAKE AN ONLINE DONATION WITH YOUR CREDIT CARD OR PAYPAL ACCOUNT
.

Click here to go to our online donations page. 

 

2. ADOPT A CAT AND SUPPORT ANIMALS IN OUR CARNIVORE CARE CENTRE (CCC)


Click here to go to the support page to find out annual costs.
  

 

3. SUPPORT THE MONITORING OF A NEWLY, REHABILITATED CARNIVORE IN OUR 200 km² NATURE RESERVE


Click here to go to the support page to find out annual costs.


 

5. BUILD A KRAAL

Click here for more information about Kraals  

 

6. SUPPORT ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION


Click here for information on costs for a group of 18 children to visit one of our Education Centres.

Click here for donation forms.

 

7. DONATE TO  HUMAN-WILDLIFE CONFLICT MITIGATION AND COMMUNITY SUPPORT. 


If livestock is safe, predators are tolerated!
 This funding goes towards covering the cost of building cattle and goat kraals (pens) in the local communities.
The materials to build a kraal which holds 50 goats costs approximately US$2,765, £1,825, €2,220.
  

 

8. ADOPT A SPOT

When you symbolically ADOPT-A-SPOT for AfriCat, you are helping Namibia’s predators during this most challenging time in their existence. Adopt-a-Spot is an enjoyable and fun way of helping AfriCat to help Namibia’s spotted cats. It’s an easy and affordable opportunity to contribute to the conservation of large carnivores in Namibia. he funding goes towards the AfriCat Foundation’s general running costs, veterinary expenses, computers, vehicles, cameras, collars, telemetry, research, and fuel. Read more about adopt-a-spot here.  

 

9. HELP SPONSOR THE MANGETTI WILD DOG RESEARCH PROJECT 


This is the first collaborative effort between the Namibia Nature Foundation (NNF), N/a’an ku se Foundation, and AfriCat. The selected study site (Mangetti Cattle Ranch and Mangetti National Park), is situated in the Kavango Region along the boundary between commercial farmland and Kavango communal farmland, to the east of the Etosha National Park. The study area includes about 40 farms and covers approximately 200,000 hectares (2,000 square kilometers), where wild dog packs are regularly sighted and farmer-predator conflict threatens their long-term survival.   Read more about the Namibia Wild Dog Project.

 

10. CELEBRATE THE LIFE, ACHIEVEMENTS, AND CHARACTER OF SOMEONE YOU CHERISH! 


Read more information about Legacies on our support page.  

 

11. GRAB A GROUP OF YOUR COLLEAGUES


Engage your colleagues and friends to conduct a joint fund-raiser to raise donations for AfriCat – hold competitions, arrange a jumble sale, auction, and other fun events to motivate your co-workers and friends to raise a donation for AfriCat.   Read more on workplace sponsorships  

 

12. SPONSOR YOUR FRIEND OR PARTNER

Sponsor friends, colleagues, or partners to mark an achievement - run a marathon in AfriCat’s name, swim for AfriCat, play football for AfriCat – all for a good cause.  

 

13. DONATE  TOWARDS  RESEARCH – sponsor a collar


Read more about this on our support page.  

 

motion detection cameras
Sponsor motion detection cameras.
adopt a spot
Make a donation to adopt a spot.
adopt a spot
Adopt a spot in person on your visit.
adopt a spot
Adopt a spot in person on your visit.
vet procedures
Help fund veterinary procedures.
vet procedures
Help fund veterinary procedures.
vehicle sponsored by solvay
vehicle sponsored by Solvay.
an sponsor handing over africat donation goats
Donations for goats.
cycling sani1
Cycle for AfriCat.

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