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The Three Phases of AfriCat’s Carnivore Care & Information Centre

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AfriCat’s Carnivore Care & Information Centre - IN MEMORY OF THE LATE JIM MALTMAN:

http://www.africat.org/support/donate/legacy/obituary-jim-maltman

Clinic and AfriCat HQ Office pre 2011:

africat clinic and hq pre 2011 africat clinic and hq pre 2011africat clinic and hq pre 2011

The AfriCat Carnivore Care Information Centre and Veterinary Clinic Today:

africat clinic and hq post 2011 africat clinic and hq post 2011africat clinic and hq post 2011

We’ve come a long way since afternoon tea with 'Chinga' on the lawn!

From cheetah, lion and leopard rescue, care and release - TO rescue, rehabilitation, community support and research! From farmer support - TO 'Conservation Through Education'!

We are committed to encouraging our youth and communities to ensure the survival of large carnivores, within a balanced ecosystem.

Here at AfriCat, over the past two decades, the Rescue and Release Programme developed as a result of our relationship with the farming community. The 'Welfare and Carnivore Care Centre', in turn, was a by-product of the Rescue and Release Programme.

 

PHASE 1:

We currently hold cheetah in our care that are young, fit and wild enough to be part of our Rehabilitation Project. There are, however a few cheetah, leopard and lion too old or tame to go back into the wild. These individuals will live out their lives under the expert care of the AfriCat team and continue to be "ambassadors" for their wild counter-parts at AfriCat’s Carnivore Care Centre.

However, 2011 was the dawn of a different direction for AfriCat and with that a renewed focus on our Environmental Education Programmes and the completion of the AfriCat HQ Carnivore Care and Information Centre as well as construction of the new AfriCat North base!
It started with a much needed office in 2011; to make room for an information/display area, then the upgrade of all the carnivore enclosures in 2012 and the new AfriCat North base – west of Etosha National Park (ENP); the completion of the AfriCat veterinary clinic in 2013, with its examination/procedure room, storage, and laboratory facilities, which provides an excellent veterinary facility and working environment for carnivore health; and now the final phase accomplished end 2016, which includes a second information-display room and presentation facility!
We can now offer visitors a valuable insight into the 'work' of The AfriCat Foundation.

pahse1 new office added
2011 New office added to the old block
pahse1 new africat team members
New team members joined us - Selma Amadhila and Jenny Noack
pahse1 new africat info area in the making
2011 New Information area in the making
pahse1 new africat info area in action
2011 New Information area in action
pahse1 old office africat display area
The old office was moved out and the room became the first display area
pahse1 africats main programme ee 220px
AfriCat's main programme is now Environmental Education
pahse1 africats main programme ee
AfriCat's main programme is now Environmental Education
pahse1 cramped clinic
Cramped clinic with no space between scholars, students and vets
pahse1 cramped clinic
Cramped clinic with no space between scholars, students and vets
phase1 adopt a spot
The adopt a spot wall was added for some fun with our visiting children
pahse1 adopt a spot
The adopt a spot wall was added for some fun with our visiting children
pahse1 adopt a spot
The adopt a spot wall was added for some fun with our visiting children
pahse1 adopt a spot
The adopt a spot wall was added for some fun with our visiting children
phase1 africat north ee
AfriCat North - Environmental Education
phase1 africat north kraal
AfriCat North community support stock kraal building
phase1 africat north community support
AfriCat North community support in full swing
phase1 africat north lion guardians
AfriCat North lion guardians got cracking
phase1 africat north base was set up
The AfriCat North base was set up west of Etosha National Park

PHASE 2:

WE ARE ETERNALLY GRATEFUL FOR JIM MALTMAN’S THOUGHTFULNESS, AS WELL AS ALL OUR UK SUPPORTERS WHO HAVE DONATED TOWARDS THE AFRICAT INFORMATION & CARNIVORE CARE CENTRE!

REALISING THE IMPORTANCE OF AFRICAT’S PROJECTS, SPONSORSHIP IS WHAT KEEPS THIS FOUNDATION ALIVE, AND SUPPORT ON AN 'ONGOING BASIS' – IS WHAT IS CONSIDERED BY MANY TO BE THE MOST EFFECTIVE WAY OF HELPING A FOUNDATION ACHIEVE GOOD WORK.

phase2 new veterinary clinic being built
AfriCat's new veterinary clinic being built
phase2 vet clinic improved
AfriCat's new veterinary clinic is a major improvement to our Care Centre
phase2 vet clinic improved
AfriCat's new veterinary clinic is a major improvement to our Care Centre and enough space for our education programme to benefit from
phase2 vet clinic improved
AfriCat's new veterinary clinic is a major improvement to our Care Centre
phase2 africats vet helping all wildlife
AfriCat's new veterinary helping all wildlife
phase2 africat clinic wall
AfriCat's Clinic wall was turned into a WEB of environmental information for the EE Programme

AfriCat's Clinic wall was turned into a WEB of environmental information for the EE Programme:

phase2 africat clinic wallphase2 africat clinic wall

We have also added 2 more hides so that the Carnivore Ambassadors can be studied and admired from a safe distance by our visiting scholars.

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PHASE 3:

AfriCat's Information Centre Phase 3:

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WHY we do what we do?

STOCK FARMERS:
Habitat loss is one of the largest threats to the cheetah, lion and leopard populations in Namibia. Livestock (communal and commercial) and game farms in Namibia number over 7000 and spread over most of the country - the same areas where the majority of these carnivores exist. The resulting conflict between these predators and farmers protecting their livelihood reduces the natural habitat areas where the animals can safely exist.

GAME FARMERS: 
With a shift in focus from cattle farming to a livelihood dependent on game for tourism and/or hunting, there has been an increasing trend where the predation of game has become the motivation behind the elimination of cheetahs and leopards. The perceived "problem animals" who in the past were removed for preying on livestock, are now also being captured for hunting one of their natural prey species.

General predator removal is often the "livestock-protection method" utilised by farmers who view all predators as "problem animals" and cheetahs, lions, hyaenas, jackals, caracal lynx and leopards are trapped, poisoned or shot on sight. In most cases an individual animal is responsible for stock losses and not the species in general and this indiscriminate removal leads to the unnecessary elimination of many innocent animals.

During the 1980’s and 90’s between 600 -1000 cheetahs were destroyed on an annual basis by farmers and hunters, today that number apparently has been reduced to a reported 200 - 300 per year, but not enough research has been conducted to give reliable statistics – the number could be higher?!

The three pillars of conservation, namely ministry, private sector and non-government organisations (NGO’S), such as The AfriCat Foundation, have joined forces to work together, to increase awareness of the plight of the cheetah, lion, leopard and other carnivores and to find solutions to the conflicting interests of farmer and predator. Research into cheetah and other carnivore numbers, distribution and behaviour, runs parallel with wildlife education for our youth and workshops for newly emerging farmers on how to coexist with their wild heritage.

OKONJIMA NATURE RESERVES 
Okonjima, Herero for "place of the baboon", is an extensive tract of land nestling amongst the Omboroko Mountains some fifty kilometers south of the small town of Otjiwarongo.

Historically, the surrounding land would have been home to some of Africa’s finest wildlife, today it is farmland. For the last 46 years Okonjima has been in the hands of the Hanssen family. Today, nearly 25 years after Wayne, Donna & Rosalea Hanssen took over a cattle farm from their father, the original farm has grown in size to 22 000 hectares, the cattle have gone, grasslands are returning and the wildlife abounds.

Also aware of the increasing lion and spotted hyaena conflict along the southern ENP boundary, and witnessing livestock farmers, suffering high losses, the AfriCat North project was established in 1989, with a mission to finding workable solutions to the lion-farmer conflict.

The key to the Okonjima experience is The AfriCat Foundation, a non- profit organisation dedicated to the conservation of Namibia’s large carnivores. With the cheetah, leopard and lion as its flagship, the foundation works alongside the farming community, attempting to help alleviate the livestock losses caused by predators.

To observe these magnificent animals in natural surroundings and to witness the rehabilitation efforts to return them to the wild, provides the visitor with the chance to come to know a little more about the story of Africa, its harmonies and its conflicts. The wheel turns full circle as the traveller leaves Okonjima with the knowledge that through his/her visit, he/she has laid yet another stone in the road to recovery for Africa’s carnivores.

The corner stone to success of conservation rests on that old adage "If it pays, it stays". Today in Namibia, a significant amount of the money which visitors spend during their time in the country, finds its way back into the programmes which aid in the conservation of the animals living there. Not only are his loss-costs covered, but also there are opportunities for his wife and children to be employed, and when the lodge makes a profit, he/she preferably receives a dividend either as a cash hand-out or as a new school or health clinic. This is hopefully the Namibia of today.

phase3 2017 clinic in action
The Clinic in action
phase3 2017 clinic in action
The Clinic in action
phase3 2017 clinic in action
The Clinic in action
phase3 2017 africat information centre
Phase 3 2017 - The final touches
phase3 2017 africat information centre
Phase 3 2017 - The final touches
phase3 2017 africat information centre
Phase 3 2017 - The final touches
phase3 2017 africat information centre
Phase 3 2017 - The final touches
phase3 2017 africat information centre
Phase 3 2017 - The final touches
africat sponsors make all the difference
Sponsors make all the difference
africat sponsors make all the difference
africat sponsors make all the difference
Sponsors make all the difference - In honour of those that will never be forgotten.
africat sponsors make all the difference
Sponsors make all the difference - The late Jimmy Maltman
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